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WELLESLEY COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



ANNUAL REPORTS 

PRESIDENT AND TREASURER 

J9n 



WELLESLEY, MASSACHUSETTS 
MARCH, 1912 



PUBUSHED BY THE COLLEGE IN NOVEMBER, JANUARY. MARCH, MAY. JULY 

Entered as second-class matter December 20, 1911, at the post oflace, 
Wellesley, Massachusetts, under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894, 



SERIES 1 NUMBER 2 



k^ 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



PKESLDENT AND TREASURER 




1911 



BOSTON : 
Frank Wood, Printer, 352 Washington Street 

1912 



PRESIDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT 



To the Board of Trustees of Wellesley College : — 

I have the honor to present a report for the year closing 
November i, 191 1. During the greater part of the year 
under review the College was without a President, and was 
by vote of the Trustees in charge of the Dean. Whenever 
in the history of the College an emergency has arisen, the 
Academic Council of the Faculty has always ably met the 
situation, and throughout the past year the co-operation of 
the Council with the Dean has been genuine and hearty. 

During the year the Trustees have amended the statutes so 
as to provide for a fourth stated meeting of the Board. By 
this amendment the stated meetings will occur the second 
Friday of November, January and June, and the third 
Friday of March. It is the intention to present the budget 
for the following year at the March meeting. 

During the year on petition of the Trustees the Legisla- 
ture of Massachusetts authorized the College to increase from 
five to ten million dollars the amount of property it might 
hold free from taxation. 

In her last report President Hazard referred to the Sophie 
Jewett Memorial Library which was to be established in 
College Hall. This library is now actually in place, and 
has already shown its usefulness. The former students and 
friends of Anne Eugenia Morgan, Professor of Philosophy, 
1877-1900, asked permission to found a library in her 
memory, and thus another alcove in College Hall Library is 
dedicated to this purpose. This emphasizes anew the use 
which is made of the old College Hall Library as a study hall 
for students not resident in College Hall. During the 
working hours of the day every seat is occupied, and the 
librarian reports that the assistant in charge has applied for 
more chairs. 



Wellesley College 

On the recommendation of the librarian, the Trustees 
voted to return to the Italian Government the manuscript 
poems of Antonio Pucci. This document known as the 
Kirkup Manuscript was among the volumes of the Frances 
Taylor Pearsons Plimpton Italian Library, and the action of 
the Trustees was cordially approved by Mr. Plimpton, the 
donor. The manuscript is to become the property of the 
National Library in Florence, and goes back to Italy with 
the bookplate of the Plimpton Library and the stamp of 
Wellesley College upon it. Dr. Jesse Benedict Carter, 
Director of the American School of Classical Studies in 
Rome, has consented to act for the College in turning over 
this manuscript to the Italian Government. While the 
actual presentation has not yet been made, already the satis- 
faction and gratitude of the Italian Government has been 
expressed by the Minister of Public Instruction. 

The Academic Council has quite properly during this 
year enacted no important legislation. One unit in Botany, 
following the definition of the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board, has been added to the alternative subjects which 
may be offered for admission. The action of the Council 
last year in establishing the requirement in Physical Educa- 
tion in the freshman and sophomore years went into effect 
this year with the classes of 1913 and 1914. While the 
distance of Mary Hemenway Hall is a disadvantage, already 
the good effects of the requirement are seen, and a higher 
standard of hygienic living is gaining ground among the 
students. The following new courses were offered in 1910-1 1 
with the approval of the Academic Council and the Execu- 
tive Committee of the Board of Trustees : — 

French: The literary movement in France during the 
second half of the nineteenth century. Three hours a week 
for a year. 

German: Studies in modern German idiom. One hour a 
week for a year. 

History: The Politics of Eastern Europe. One hour a 
week for a year. Selected studies in American History. 
Three hours a week for a year. 



President's Report 

Latin: Livy and Cicero. Three hours a week for the first 
semester. Ovid and Cicero. Three hours a week for the 
second semester. Virgil and the Augustan Age. Three 
hours a week for a semester. 

Music: Beethoven and Wagner. Three hours a week for 
a year. 

Philosophy: Reading course in German Psychology. One 
hour a week for a year. 

The reports of the various departments show that during 
the year 1910-11, 219 courses were actually given by the 
departments, aggregating 484^ hours per week, not includ- 
ing hours duplicated because of additional sections of the 
same course. The distribution of these courses among the 
various departments will be found in the appendix. In 
1909-10, 3i6 courses were offered, aggregating 47SJ hours 
of instruction per week. The following table shows the 
comparison of the relative amount of instruction given by 
the various departments in the years 190S-09, 1909-10, 
1910-11 : — 

Departments. Instruction Units. 

190S-1909 1909-1910 1910-1911 

Art 454 437 518 

Astronomy 354 279 250 

Biblical History i>239 ii370 ^A5^ 

Botany 992 S97 1,112 

Chemistry 3581^ 349 j^ 456 

Economics 661^ 5S9 7i3^ 

Education 321 463 402 

Elocution 226 244 245 

English Composition. ... 1,898 i)477 1,804 

English Language 144 225 132 

English Literature 2,150 2,219 2,252 

French 1,257 1,114 1,219 

Geology 117 303 264 

German i ,644 i ,604^ i ,587 

Greek 218 173 207 

History i,35VA 1.555 i'3i5 

* Hygiene 399 353 421 

Italian 73 75 69 

* The number of instruction units is given for the required freshman course 
only. 

5 



Wellesley College 

Departments. Instruction Units. 

190S-1909 1909-1910 1910-1911 

Latin 655)^ 523 578 

Mathematics (Applied).. 21 30 3 

Mathematics (Pure) i,8iS 1,792 2,026 

Musical Theory 442/^ 420 SSSH 

Philology 10 

Philosophy 1,055 1.148/^ i,o8o>^ 

Physics 477>^ 308 >^ 322 

Spanish 57 54 69 

Zoology 444 735 556^^ 

The department reports show that the work has been car- 
ried with the usual enthusiasm and efficiency. 

Leave of absence for 1910-11 was granted to the following 
members of the staff: Miss Coman, Miss Kendall, Miss 
Walton, Miss Puthod, Miss Howard, Miss Young, Mrs. 
Hodder, Miss Regnie and Miss Haskell. 

New appointments to the teaching staff were as follows: 
Martha Pike Conant, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 
Literature; Lois Kimball Mathews, Ph.D., Associate Pro- 
fessor of History; Emma Marie Scholl, Ph.D., Associate 
Professor of German; Emilie Josephine Hutchinson, M.A., 
Instructor in Economics; Marion Edna Bowler, B.A., In- 
structor in French; Elizabeth Church, M.A., Instructor in 
English Literature; Maud Bassett Gorham, Ph.D., Instructor 
in Rhetoric and Composition ; Mabelle Louise Moses, M. A., 
Instructor in History; Muriel Streibert, B.A., Instructor in 
Biblical History; Helene Amelie Forest, Lie. es L., In- 
structor in French; Lacey Davis Caskey, B.A., Instructor 
in Greek Sculpture; Frederick Henry Lahee, M.A., In- 
structor in Geology; Mabel Keyes Babcock, B.A., M.S., 
Instructor in Horticulture and Landscape Architecture; 
Elizabeth Robbins Hooker, B.A., Instructor in Rhetoric and 
Composition; Elizabeth Stewart, B.S., Instructor in Mathe- 
matics. Mrs. Lois Kimball Mathews, Associate Professor 
of History, resigned after a year of conspicuously successful 
service to accept the position of Dean of Women and Asso- 
ciate Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin. 
Other members of the teaching staff who retired from the 
service of the College in June, 191 1, are as follows: Miss 

6 



President's Report 

Marcial, Miss Regnie, Miss Haskell, Dr. Sterling, Miss Sted- 
man. Miss Cheron, Miss French, Miss Pope, Miss Sawtelle, 
Miss Kreutz, Miss Hutchinson, Miss Bowler, Miss Gorham, 
Miss Moses, Mr. Caskey, Miss Hooker, and Miss Stewart. 

The Alice Freeman Palmer Fellowship for 1911-13 was 
awarded in March, 1911,10 Miss Violet Barbour, A. B., 1906, 
A.M., 1909, Cornell, who will carry on her investigation in 
History in London, Oxford, and The Hague. Provision was 
made by Eben Norton Horsford in his gift for the sabbatical 
grant by which the Trustees might at their discretion award a 
grant to some proved alumna of the College for study abroad. 
Accordingly a grant was made by the Trustees under this 
provision to Helen Somersby French, B.A., 1907, M.A., 
1 910, Instructor in Chemistry; this was increased by an 
award from the Academic Council, made possible by personal 
contributions of members, and Miss French is spending the 
year at the University of Berlin. In recognition of the fact 
that 191 1 marked the 25th anniversary of the class of which 
Professor Horsford was an honorary member, and that Miss 
French's subject, Chemistry, was Professor Horsford's own 
specialty, the Trustees created Miss French, Horsford Fellow. 

In June, 191 1, 275 students received the degree of B.A. 
This makes the total number of Bachelor degrees conferred 
by the College, 4, 169. Among the requirements for the degree 
of B.A. every candidate for the degree must show that she 
has completed either nine hours in each of two departments, 
or 12 hours in one department and 6 in a second department. 
The following table gives the number of students in the class 
of 191 1 who in fulfillment of this requirement completed 9 
hours or more in the various departments : — 



English Literature 


125* 


Economics 


16 


German 


71 


Zoology 


15 


History 


69 


Philosophy 


13 


French 


34 


Chemistry 


II 


Pure Mathematics 


31 


Greek 


ID 


English Composition 


30* 


Art 


7 


Botany 


23 


Biblical History 


3 


Latin 


22 


Physics 


2 


Musical Theory 


17 


Italian 


I 



♦English Language must be counted to makeup the nine hours in 3 instances 
under English Literature and in 19 under English Composition. 



Wellesley College 



The total number of students registered November i, 191 1, 
was 1,433, classified as follows : — 

Resident candidates for the M.A. degree 38 

Candidates for the B. A. degree i ,349 

Seniors 277 

Juniors 275 

Sophomores 343 

Freshmen 4.54 

Non-candidates for degrees 46 

Total 1,433 

Compared with the registration of November i, 1910, the 
figures show a net gain of 55 : — 

Gain. Loss. 

Seniors 9 

Juniors 26 

Sophomores 62 

Freshmen 14 

Specials 11 

Graduates 7 

92 37 

37 

Net gain 55 

The following tables show the losses and gains in three 
classes between November i, 1910, and November i, 191 1 : — 

November I, 1910. Loss. Gain. November i, 1911. 

Class of 1912 (Juniors) 301 36 12 (Seniors) 277 

Class of 1913 (Sophomores) 2S1 39 33 (Juniors) 275 

Class of 1914 (Freshmen) 440 112 15 (Sophomores) 343 

Class Class Class Total 

Losses. of of of of three 

1912. 1913. iQH- Classes. 
Left College before, or at, the end of 

year 7 30 62 99 

Were "dropped" on account of poor 

scholarship and left College i 4 23 28 

Died 2103 

Entered higher class 10 3 1 1 24 

Entered lower class 16 i 16 33 

Total 36 39 112 1 87 

Gains. 

From higher class o 16 i 17 

From lower class 4 12 1 17 

From new students 02 8 10 

From students re-admitted after absence. . S3 5 16 

Total 12 33 15 60 

8 



President's Report 

The first application registered for admission in September, 
1911, was received May 26, 1906, and in all 1,053 applica- 
tions were registered. Only 470 students were admitted in 
September, 191 1. The other 583 applicants were accounted 
for in the following table : — 

Total number of applications received for 191 1 15053 

Applications withdrawn (including those who 
were rejected and those who were urged to 

withdraw 37° 

Applications transferred to 1912 193 

Applicants died 4 

Applicants failing to file credentials 9 

Applicants failing to appear 7 

Applicants admitted 470 

Total 1,053 

As indicated above, the total number of new students ad- 
mitted in September, 191 1, was 470: one more than were 
admitted in October, 1910. These 470 new students are 
classified as follows : — 

Freshmen 433 

Sophomores 8 

Juniors 2 

Seniors o 

Specials iQ 

Graduate Students 8 

Of these 470 new students, 31 applied for advanced stand- 
ing, 10 secured rank above that of freshman, and four others 
had sufficient advanced work accepted to give them sophomore 
or junior rank, but had not met all the admission require- 
ments. These 14 came from the following institutions: — 

Brookings ( S. D. ) Agricultural College 

Colorado College 

Goucher College 

Indiana University 

Milwaukee-Downer College 

Mt. Holyoke College 

Transylvania University 

University of Chicago 

University of Louisville 

University of Michigan 

University of Minnesota 2 

Western Reserve University i 



Wkllesley College 

The freshman class, which numbers 454, inckides 16 stu- 
dents who were in college last year, and are still ranked as 
freshmen, ^^ former students returning after an absence, and 
433 new students. These 433 new freshmen were admitted 
as follows : — 

From public schools 278 

From private schools , 139 

From public and private schools 16 

By certificate 283 

Partly by certificate and partly by examination. . . 140 

Wholly by examination 10 

2S2 schools are represented by these 433 new freshmen. 

97 of these schools are situated in New England. 185 outside 

New England. 

Of the new freshmen, 43 took all or a part of their exam- 
inations under the College Entrance Examination Board. 
Twenty-one others took examinations of the College Entrance 
Examination Board, but as they were unsuccessful or took 
examinations which did not meet the requirements, they were 
obliged to take the September examinations offered at Welles- 
ley, and therefore the certificate of tlie Board was not used for 
admission. 

Every student must present for admission fifteen points. 
Of these points ten are absolutely prescribed as follows : three 
in English, four in Latin, three in Mathematics. The other 
prescribed point must be offered in History, but the candidate 
has a number of alternatives from which to choose. Of the 
remaining four points, three must be offered in some one 
foreign language other than Latin, and the fourth in a third 
foreign language or in Chemistry or Physics. The 433 new 
freshmen fulfilled these requirements as follows : — 

Three points in Greek 34 

Three points in German 206 

Three points in French 214 

One point in Greek 10 

One point in German 122 

One point in French 106 

One point in Chemistry 72 

One point in Physics 130 

One point in Botany i 

Thirty-four students who were admitted without conditions 
offered credentials which aggregated more than the fifteen 

10 



President's Report 

points prescribed for admission. The largest number of 
points accepted for any candidate was eighteen. Twenty 
other students, who were conditioned in work absolutely pre- 
scribed for admission, offered satisfactory credentials in the 
other subjects aggregating from fourteen to fifteen points. 
Of the 433 new students in this year's freshman class, 377 
were admitted without conditions, or more than 87 per cent, 
and of the 56 admitted with conditions, 52 were conditioned 
in one subject only, and 30 in one point only. The smallest 
number of points accepted for any student was eleven and 
one half, and but one student was admitted with this number 
of points. 

The Dean stated in her report last year that in her opinion 
the slisfht increase in the number of new students admitted in 
the past years should stop until the Trustees were prepared 
to build more dormitories, and in other ways to increase the 
equipment of the College. In accordance with this recom- 
mendation the Trustees authorized the Dean, if necessary, to 
decrease the number of new students admitted in September, 
191 1, but it was not found possible to do this without injus- 
tice. Although the College opens with 55 more students 
than last year, it will be noted that the number of new stu- 
dents is only one greater than last year. Steps have been 
taken to make it possible without injustice to decrease the 
number of new students in September, 191 3. The applica- 
tion list for next year is to close on November ist, whereas 
heretofore it has not closed until January ist. 

It is to be regretted that no report from the Director of 
Halls of Residence can be published this year. Hardly two 
weeks ago Miss Davis was called away by the death of her 
brother, and a recommendation will be presented with this 
report that she be given a year's leave of absence as soon as 
she finds it practicable to take it, and she may be absent for 
the greater part of the current year. 

By vote of the Trustees an addition to Eliot House was 
authorized, providing for the residence of thirty-three stu- 
dents, and a dining room seating 133 students. Through the 
untiring effort of the Director of Halls of Residence, who 

II 



Wkllesley College 

spent the entire summer in Wellesley, this was opened in 
September, 191 1, and meets a real need, not only for the 
housing, but for the feeding of students. The College now 
houses and feeds 993 of its 1,433 students, and feeds without 
housing 235 more. Of the remaining 305, 50 are non- 
resident ; that is, they live with their parents or guardians. 

In March Mrs. Anna Stedman Newman resigned the posi- 
tion which she had held for twenty-five years as Superintend- 
ent of Norumbega Cottage. The Trustees passed in June, 
191 1, the following vote: "In accepting the resignation of 
Mrs. Anna Newman from the Superintendent of Norumbega 
Cottage, the Trustees wish to place on record their grateful 
appreciation of her twenty-five years of devoted service. The 
college home, which she created at Norumbega, is highly val- 
ued by the Trustees, who feel assured that it will live in the 
memory of all those who have shared its comforts and en- 
joyed its hospitality as a cherished and lasting possession." 
Mrs. Newman was the pioneer at Wellesley in creating a 
home atmosphere in the halls of residence, and the College 
must always be grateful to her for the standard of home- 
making which she established. 

In February Professor George Herbert Palmer carried out 
a long cherished plan in presenting to the College a complete 
collection of the first editions of the works of Robert and 
Elizabeth Barrett Browning. The collection, while priceless 
in value is small in bulk, and is housed in an ebony cabinet 
in the Browning Room. The presentation was made on 
February 21st, the anniversary of Mrs. Palmer's birth. 
Those who heard Professor Palmer tell of the gathering of 
the collection begun during Mrs. Palmer's lifetime, felt the 
individuality of the books, and Mrs. Durant's inimitable 
speech accepting the gift charmed all her hearers. 

In June the class of 1SS6, returning for their 25th re- 
union, were able to carry out their plan of presenting to 
the College a suitable memorial of their honorary member, 
and friend, Eben Norton Horsford. The fitting place for 
such a memorial all agreed was the Library, since its endow- 
ment for books is so largely his gift. On June 17th the 

12 



President's Report 

class presented to the College bronze doors for the Library. 
Mrs. Louella Smith Braley, '86^ presided at the exercises, an 
appreciation of Professor Horsford and a description of the 
doors was given by Mrs. Anna Broadwell Davidson, the 
formal address was made by Mr. Richard Henry Dana, 
an old friend of Professor Horsford, Mrs. Durant spoke 
briefly for the Trustees, and the President, also a member of 
the class of '86, accepted from Mrs. Davidson the gift on 
behalf of the College. 

The Alumnae Association appropriated $500 for a graduate 
fellowship, which was awarded to Grace Esther Munson, 
A.B., University of Nebraska, 191 1. Miss Munson has begun 
her work at Wellesley in Physics and Astronomy, and she 
hopes to obtain her Master's degree in June, 191 3. In found- 
ing this fellowship the Alumnae Association did not expect to 
offer the fellowship every year, but in June, 191 1, through 
the generosity of individual alumnae, the committee of the 
Association was authorized to offer two fellowships of $300 
each for the year 1911-13. It was voted by the Association 
to name these two fellowships atfer the two well loved 
professors of the first faculty of the College. The Susan M. 
Hallowell Fellowship is offered to Wellesley graduates only, 
and is to be used for graduate study in any American or 
foreign university. The Mary E. Horton Fellowship is open 
to any approved holder of the B.A. degree who wishes to 
pursue graduate work at Wellesley College. These fellow- 
ships are but an added proof of the genuine loyalty and 
generosity which has always characterized the alumna3 of 
Wellesley. 

The College was fortunate in obtaining the consent of 
Angle Clara Chapin, Professor of Greek, to act as Dean for 
the year 1911-12. Professor Chapin will be assisted by Miss 
Edith Souther Tufts, the Registrar of the College, who will 
have supervision of the work of freshmen. Miss Chapin 
keeping the immediate supervision of the three upper classes. 

I cannot close this report without expressing to you my 
gratitude for your assistance and co-operation in meeting the 
various problems of the past year. I have already formally 

13 



Wellesley College 

acknowledged my appreciation of the high trust which you 
committed to me in electing me to the presidency of 
Wellesley College. That my predecessors in this high office 
have won for the College an honorable place in the academic 
world, is shown by the presence at the inauguration of a large 
number of delegates from educational institutions all over the 
country, by the friendly interest and recognition of a 
common aim shown in the spirit of the addresses on that 
occasion. This recognition of the share of Wellesley College 
in the education of the youth of our country, challenges the 
best effort of us all, Trustees, President, Faculty, and students 
alike. 

ELLEN F. PENDLETON. 

November i, 191 1. 



T4 



REPORT OF THE CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE 
ON GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 



To the President of Wellesley College. 

Madam : — 

I have the honor to present the following report of the 
graduate work clone at Wellesley College during the year 
November i, 1910 to November i, 191 1. 

Of the thirty-eight students reported as registered for 
graduate study in the year 1910— 11, fourteen completed the 
work and received the M.A. degree in June, thus showing 
that the increase in this department of the college is not merely 
one of numbers in attendance, but also of achievement. The 
increase in numbers during the last five years is shown in the 
following table : — 

Graduate Students in Residence Degree Conferred 

1906-07 23 1907 6 

1907-08 25 190S 7 

1908-09 22 1909 4 

1909-10 31 1910 6 

1910-11 38 1911 14 

The work for the degrees given in June, 191 1, was dis- 
tributed among various departments as follows : — 

Eng. Literature and Language 4 Physics and Astronomy 

English Literature . . .1 Chemistry and Physics . 

Mathematics and Astronomy 2 Geology and Chemistry . 

Education and French . . i History .... 

History and Education . . 1 Philosophy and Psychology 

These students received their first degrees from six different 
colleges, as follows : Wellesley College nine, University of 

15 



Wellesley College 

Maine, Lake Erie College, Cape Gerardeau College, Indiana 
University and Dalhousie College, one each. 

The holder of the Alice Freeman Palmer Fellowship for 
the year 1910— ii was Miss Laura A. Hibbard, B.A., 
Wellesley College, 1905, M. A., 1907. She spent the fall and 
winter in Chicago University working in the field of Middle 
English Romance. As a part of the work for her doctor's 
dissertation she prepared a Bibliography of Romance Studies 
during the years 1900-10, and began work upon the thesis 
itself on the subject " Recurrent Elements in Middle English 
Romance." She spent the spring and summer studying 
manuscript sources for this work in the libraries of Oxford, 
London, and Paris, and published a book entitled Three 
Middle English Romances^ and a short article on " Beves of 
Hampton" va. Modern Language A^o/e^ f or May, 191 1, both 
appearing during her stay in England. 

She returned in the fall to her work as instructor in English 
Literature in Mt. Holyoke College and expects to complete 
her doctor's thesis in addition to her teaching. 

The Alice Freeman Palmer Fellowship for 1911-13 was 
awarded to Miss Violet Barbour, A.B., Cornell University, 
1906, A.M., 1909. She was elected to ^ B K in her junior 
year, and held a Graduate Scholarship in History at Cornell 
University 190S-09. An article elaborated from her 
Master's thesis, entitled " Privateers and Pirates of the West 
Indies in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries," and also 
a review of Harding's The Buccaneers of the West Indies in 
the Seventeenth Century^ were published in the American 
Historical Review for April, 191 1. 

Miss Barbour is spending the year working with manuscripts 
in the libraries of London, Oxford, Paris, and The Hague, and 
is continuing her investigation in the field in which she has 
already won success. 

For the year 1911-12 the number of graduate students in 
residence is thirty-eight, the same number as for last year. 
Seven others who have completed most of the work for the 
degree and are not in residence at Wellesley hope to be ready to 
receive the degree in June, 1912. Of the thirty-eight students 

16 



Report of the Committee on Graduate Instruction 

in residence, twelve were here last year, one returned after an 
interval of two years and the remaining twenty-five began 
their graduate work this year, eighteen of them having 
received their B.A. degree, in June, 191 1, either at Wellesley 
or elsewhere. 

The thirty-eight students represent ten colleges and uni- 
versities, from which they received the B.A. degree as 
follows: Wellesley College 28, Mt. Holyoke' College 2, 
Boston University, Brown University, Goucher College, 
University of Nebraska, Radcliffe College, Smith College, 
University of Washington and The Western College, one 
each. 

The graduate work is distributed among eighteen depart- 
ments as follows : — 



Archaeology 


. I 


English Language . 


I 


Art . 


. I 


French 


4 


Astronomy 


• 4 


Geology and Geography 




Botany 


• 4 


German . 




Chemistry 


. 2 


History 




Economics 


. I 


Italian 




Education 


• 9 


Latin 




English Literature 


. 10 


Philosophy & Psychology i 


English Compositio 


n . 2 


Physics . 


1 



Sixteen of the graduate students hold appointments from 
the college as instructors or as assistants in the departments 
in which they are studying or in administrative work. 

Thirty of them hold the thirty graduate scholarships offered 
by the college. 

Last spring the Alumnae Association of Wellesley College 
offered a fellowship of $500 for the year 1911-12, avail- 
able for graduate study in candidacy for the M.A. degree at 
Wellesley. The requirements are stated as follows by the 
committee of award : — 

The holder of this fellowship must be a graduate of Wellesley or 
of some other institution of satisfactory standing, and preferably a 
graduate who has been a successful teacher for not less than three 
years and has at the same time given evidence of continued interest 
and ability in some iield of study in which she made a good record 



17 



Wellesley College 

while in college. Such evidence may be in the form of papers, notes, 
outlines, collections, publications, etc. Quality rather than quantity 
will be regarded as significant. 

The fellowship was awarded for this year to Miss Grace E. 
Munson, A.B., University of Nebraska, 191 1. She is work- 
ing in physics and astronomy, with the expectation of com- 
pleting the work for the degree during this year. 

For the year 191 2— 13 the Alumna Association offers two 
fellowships of three hundred dollars each ; the first one to be 
awarded under the same terms as defined for the one given 
this year, and to be known as the Susan M. Hallowell Fellow- 
ship, the other to be called the Mary E. Horton Fellowship, 
and given under the following conditions. It is open to 
Wellesley graduates only, and is available for graduate study 
in candidacy for a higher degree at Wellesley or elsewhere. 
The holder of this fellowship may be just out of college, where 
she should, however, have made a good record in general and 
done excellent work in the subject which she wishes to 

continue. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Katharine M. Edwards, 

Chairman. 



18 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 



To the President of Wellesley College. 
Madam : — 

I have the honor to present the following report of the 
administration of the Library for the 3'ear ending October 3 1 , 
1911. 

The number of volumes owned by the Library is 70,724, 
of which 2,637 were added during the year, 2,154 ^y Pur- 
chase and 483 by gift. 

Among the noteworthy purchases of the year are : — 

The Catholic encyclopedia. 
The Encyclopaedia Britannica, nth edition. 
The Cyclopedia of Education. 
Bouvier's Law Dictionary, revised by Rawle. 
Ritson, Ancient English metrical romances. 
Suess, Face of the Earth. 
Krummel, Handbuch der ozeanographie. 
Curie, Traite de radioactivite. 
Elgood, Italian gardens. 
Elgood, Some English gardens. 
Triggs, Formal gardens in England and Scotland. 
Scientific papers of J. \V. Gibbs, and of G. H. Darwin. 
Records of the Federal Convention of 17S7, edited by Prof. Farrand. 
Sets of the works of Diderot, Pater, Henry James, Hawthorne, 
Meredith, Pope, and Synge. 

From the U. S. Documents Office we have received 30 
volumes of the Congressional debates, completing our set of 
the Proceedings of Congress from the beginning, March 4, 
1789, except for the records of three sessions. Through the 
good offices of Senator Crane and the Hon. John D. Weeks, 

19 



Wellesley College 

the Library has obtained other valuable documents. Among 
these are Thorpe's Federal and State constitutions, in 7 vol- 
umes, the Report of the Bureau of Labor on the conditions 
of woman and child wage-earners, and the Reports of the 
Immigration and Monetary commissions. 
Other noteworthy gifts are : — 

Masterpieces by Montonobu, loo collotype productions of the 
works of this Japanese artist, from Mr. Edward M. Raj-mond. 

The Notebooks of Shelley from the originals in the library of 
W. K. Bixby, edited by H. B. Forman, from Mr. Bixby. 

The Rara arithmetica, a catalogue of the arithmetics written before 
1601, from Mr. George A. Plimpton. 

On February 21st, the birthday anniversary of Alice Free- 
man Palmer, Professor Palmer gave to the College his Brown- 
ing collection. This collection of 83 books contains the 
complete works of Mr. and Mrs. Browning. With few ex- 
ceptions these are first editions and in original bindings, and 
many of them contain letters and autographs which add to 
their interest and value. The collection also comprises va- 
rious illustrative books, such as a Latin work by Rabbi ben 
Ezra, dated 1485 ; a first edition of Paracelsus, 1572 ; a treat- 
ise by Abt Vogler, 1776; and a reprint of the Old Yellow 
Book. One of the most interesting books of the collection is 
the Sonnets from the Portuguese, one of the 1 2 copies of the 
first edition printed by Miss Mitford for private circulation, 
and the particular copy given by Miss Mitford to Charles 
Kingsley. 

Two new portraits have this year been hung in the reading 
room, — President Irvine's, painted by Cari Melchers and given 
by the Class of 1895, and President Pendleton's by Miss Ellen 
Emmet, the gift of the Shakespeare Society. The two orna- 
mental bronze lamp-posts, presented by the Class of 1880, 
have been set in place in front of the Library. In June the 
beautiful bronze doors, designed by Evelyn Beatrice Long- 
man, were presented by the Class of 18S6, in memory of 
Professor Horsford, to whom the Library owes so much. 

It is a satisfaction to report that this year we have finished 
the work of transferring the shelf-list from sheets to cards, so 

20 



Report of the Librarian 

that one of the chief records of the Library is now complete. 
In future each new entry can be inserted in its proper place, 
and much time will be saved in assigning numbers to new 
books, as well as in taking the inventory of the Library. 
Considerable progress has also been made toward completing 
the dictionary catalogue, and we are continuing this as rapidly 
as possible while keeping up with current catalogue work. 
We continue to use the catalogue cards printed by the Library 
of Congress for most of our English books, but we still write 
those for books in foreign languages. Lists of new books 
added to the Library have appeared from time to time in the 
College News. 

This fall, we began to note in each book loaned, the date 
on which it was due, a fact which students had found diffi- 
culty in remembering. A supply of slips with the heading 
" Return on or before" is kept at the loan desk, and when- 
ever a book is charged one of these slips is pasted on the fly 
leaf and the date of return stamped. There is little delay 
and gradually we shall get the slips into all the books in fre- 
quent use. Besides the convenience to the borrower, we shall 
be able to tell something as to the demand for a given book. 

It has been the custom to allow students to register in ad- 
vance if they wished to take reserved books out over night. 
There has been frequent confusion when friends, who were 
sent for books, were not exactly informed as to the book 
which had been engaged. This year we decided to allow 
advance registration as before, but to require the borrower to 
bring the book to the desk for comparison with the charging 
slip before taking it out. This plan has worked well. 

When the Library was moved it was thought there would 
be frequent need of books for class-room use in College Hall, 
and arrangements were made so that instructors, by applying 
a short time in advance, could have books brought to their 
class rooms. There have, however, been few requests for 
such service, perhaps because the Library building does not 
seem to be, in reality, as far from College Hall as it was 
supposed to be, and instructors are therefore able to come 
themselves for the books they need. 

21 



Wellesley College 

We have continued to make use of the resources of other 
libraries this year under the Inter-Library Loan system, bor- 
rowing in this way, for the use of our faculty and students, 51 
volumes, chiefly from the Boston Public Library. 

Various collections of books, formerly distributed about 
College Hall, have been brought together in the old library. 
These include the Missionary Library of 750 volumes, the 
Circulating library, 200 volumes, of fiction, essays, and poetry, 
the historical material collected by the Alumnae Association, 
and the books of the Social Study circle, and of the College 
Equal Suffrage League, v/hile the Christian Association is 
considering the transfer of its library to this room. One 
alcove has been devoted to the Jewett Memorial Library and 
another to the Morgan Memorial Library. The room itself 
is much used as a study hall. It is not an unusual thing to 
find between 90 and 100 people here during busy hours and, 
at such times, every seat is filled. If we could provide places 
for 50 more students I believe that we should find the places 
occupied. 

Our Library, like most College Libraries in this country, 
is open on Sunday afternoons from 2 until 6 p. m. During 
the 33 Sundays of this college year 1,334 students used the 
Library for reading, and it was visited by 1,590 guests, an 
average of 40 readers and 4S visitors a day. The number of 
readers varied between 3 and 96, and the visitors between 12 
and 141. In 1907 when the Library was open for 6 hours 
on Sunday the average number of users was 20. No attempt 
has been made to keep a record of the number of readers 
in the College Library on week days, but it may be of 
interest to note that by actual count on a day which 
seemed only ordinarily busy there were 1 75 students at work 
there at one time. The 5 reading rooms accommodate 242 
readers. 

Exhibition of books from the Plimpton library have been 
arranged by Professor Jackson showing the development of 
the bookplate and of printers' marks. Recently the cases 
were used for a selection of books connected with characters 
or quotations from George Eliot's JRomola. At Com- 

22 



Report of the Librarian 

mencement time the editions and mss. of the works of 
Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio were on view. 

The donor of this collection continues to show an active in- 
terest in its development, putting a generous sum at the dis- 
posal of Professor Jackson on the occasion of the inauguration 
of President Pendleton. As announced at Commencement, 
the Trustees voted, after consultation with the donor, Mr. 
Plimpton, to return to Italy that part of the Kirkup ms. which 
contained the poems of Antonio Pucci, the ms. to be preserved 
in the National Library in Florence. Thus the issue of a 
much needed edition of Pucci's poems is made possible. This 
action has been acknowledged with gratitude by the Italian 
minister of public instruction. 

At the time of the Bible tercentenary the department of 
Biblical History held an exhibition of books illustrating the 
history of the Bible. Seventy-three items were shown, all the 
property of the College. They included a parchment roll 
(the Hebrew text of Esther), fragments of papyri, a palimp- 
sest, facsimiles and description of mss., editions of the Greek 
and Hebrew text, and numerous other versions. This exhibi- 
tion attracted much interest and was continued for five days. 

During the year bulletin boards have been placed in the 
delivery room and in the various reading rooms. In the de- 
livery room we attempt to post notices of all College lectures 
and concerts, as well as of art exhibitions and concerts in 
Boston. The notices of the Drama League are also shown 
here, and newspaper cuttings which seem of interest from 
time to time, such as book reviews, biographical notices, 
or maps, of current interest. We wish to use the bulletin 
in the reading room near the magazine cases for notices 
of important magazine articles, particularly articles in the 
more technical magazines, which have a general interest, 
but are likely to be overlooked by the general college com- 
munity, and we ask the co-operation of all members of the 
College in this attempt. 

The Conference Room is used this year by seven classes 
meeting there regularly thirteen times a week. One of the 
other basement rooms, fitted up temporarily for a class room 

23 



Wellesley College 

to relieve the pressure in College Hall, is used this year by 
five different classes meeting fifteen times a w^eek. 

The gift of a sum of money from the Class of 1S91 to fit 
up a room in memorj' of Miss Pierce, the late librarian, will 
make it possible to furnish one of the basement rooms as a 
study for the faculty. It is suggested that the room next to 
the Conference Room on the East be fitted with bookcases 
and tables and reserved for this purpose. This would be a 
suitable place for a collection of the official literature of the 
college, the file of President's reports and calendars, direc- 
tories, etc., of the college magazines, and books and articles 
about the college, the publications of members of the faculty, 
and of the Alice Freeman Palmer scholars, the Masters' theses, 
and the material collected by the Alumna Association includ- 
ing the publications of alumna. Members of the faculty are 
most generous in helping students in the library, but they 
need a place for work where they may count on being free 
from interruption. The room now devoted to their use is 
scantily furnished with tables and chairs from the old fifth 
floor library, but is frequently used and much appreciated. 

Three new members have been added to the library staff : 
Miss Florence L. Ellery, a graduate of the College of the Class 
of 1S8S, who is in charge of the College Hall reading room, 
and of the College Library on Sunday afternoons ; Miss 
Marjorie F. Sutcliffe, a graduate of the Library course at Sim- 
mons College; and Miss Ida F. Underbill, formerly librarian 
of the Harvard Medical School. Miss Underbill takes the 
position of cataloguer hitherto held by Miss Weed, who has 
been placed in charge of the issue of books and made Second 
Assistant Librarian. The staff now numbers 10 people. 

By a wise provision of the Board of Trustees, the amount 
available for the purchase of books has been increased to 
$6,000 a year, exclusive of the incomes of the Kirk, Shafer, 
Sweet, Wenckebach, and Abbot funds, which amount to about 
$750. This has made it possible to add to our subscription 
list periodicals which have long been desired, and to increase 
materially the appropriations to different departments. 

There have been for some years urgent requests for dupli- 

24 



Report of the Librarian 

cate copies of books to which large classes are referred for 
collateral reading. It is not possible to require students to 
purchase all the books which are needed for these courses, 
especially since some of them are used for short periods only. 
None of the various plans which have been tried have met the 
situation. Some teachers reported that without such dupli- 
cates it was impossible to conduct their courses as they would 
like, while others felt that their students were wasting time in 
efforts to secure desired books. With increased funds the 
Library committee felt justified in approving the expenditure 
of department appropriations for duplicates and in setting 
aside $250 from the general fund for this purpose. By di- 
rection of President Pendleton, $23 received as fines for delay 
in filling out schedule cards has been paid to this account, 
which has also been increased by the fines collected at the 
Library. These amount to about $150. We have used this 
money for books needed by two or more departments, or by 
the largest classes. It is not sufiicient to satisfy the demands 
of the eight departments needing duplicates, or to provide 
one copy of a book to every 15 students referred to it, which 
is the ratio adopted at Simmons College, but we have made, 
I believe, a wise beginning in supplying a demand which the 
college library, as distinguished from the university library, 
must satisfy unless we are to return to the text-book method 
of instruction. 

It is a great pleasure to report the opinion expressed by 
several members of the faculty that the character of college 
work has noticeably improved during the past year, and to find 
that the change is attributed to improved library conditions. 

In conclusion I desire to express my thanks to the Library 
Committee for kindly help and advice in the administration 
of the Library, and to the Library staff for their hearty 
support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. St. B. Brooks, 



Librarian. 



November i, 191 1. 



25 



APPENDIX TO THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



APPOINTMENTS. 

(Accepted for 1911-1912 or for a longer term.) 

Mary Oilman Ahlers, B,A., Assistant to the Registrar (and Alumnse 
General Secretary). 

Leah Brown Allen, B.A., Assistant in Astronomy. 

Ethel Leona Andem, M.A., Assistant in Education. 

Mabel Keyes Babcock, B.A., M.S., Instructor in Horticulture and 
Landscape Architecture. 

Josephine Harding Batchelder, M.A., Instructor in Rhetoric and 
Composition. 

Elizabeth Bates, Graduate Assistant in Hygiene and Physical Educa- 
tion. 

Bertha Moulton Beckford, Manager of Bookstore and Post Office. 

Ethel Bowman, M.A., Assistant in Psychology. 

Henrietta St. Barbe Brooks, B.S., Librarian. 

John Franklin Brown, Ph.D., Lecturer in Secondary Education. 

Louise Fargo Brown, Ph.D., Instructor in History. 

Josephine May Burnham, Ph.D., Instructor in Rhetoric and Com- 
position. 

Effie Jane Buell, Superintendent of Norumbega Cottage. 

Alice Huntington Bushee, M.A., Instructor in Spanish. 

Loretto Fish Carney, Instructor in Physical Education. 

Magdeleine Otten Carret, Lie. es L., Instructor in French. 

Charlotte Henderson Chadderdon, Superintendent of Webb House. 

Marion Taber Chadwick, Graduate Assistant in Physical Education. 

Maria Alice Chamberlin, B.A., Graduate Assistant in Art. 

Angle Clara Chapin, M.A., Acting Dean. 

Francis Stuart Chapin, Ph.D., Instructor in Economics. 

Elizabeth Church, M.A., Instructor in English Literature. 

Mariana Cogswell, B.A., Instructor in German. 

Carl Oscar Louis Collin, M.D., Instructor in the Theory and Prac- 
tice of Physical Education. 

Vera Beckley Colton, B.A., Graduate Assistant in Art. 

Florence Converse, M.A., Assistant in English Literature. 

Helen Dodd Cook, Ph.D., Instructor in Psychology. 

Margaret Harris Cook, Ph.D., Instructor in Zoology. 

26 



Appendix to the President's Report 

Mary Elizabeth Cook, Superintendent of Wood Cottage. 

Josephine Nash Curtis, B.A., Graduate Assistant in Psychology. 

Mary Florence Curtis, B.A., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Sumner Webster Cushing, M.A., Lecturer in Geography. 

Mary Wood Daley, M.A., Graduate Assistant in Astronomy. 

Mabel Priest Daniel, B.A., Superintendent of Cazenove Hall. 

Grace Evangeline Davis, M.A., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Louise Anne Dennison, Superintendent of Freeman Cottage. 

Lillian Drouet, B.A., Assistant in Elocution. 

Laura Morse Dwight, B.A., Assistant in Library. 

Charles Dumas, B.Litt., B. fes Sc, Assistant in French. 

Gladys Earle, B.A., Graduate Assistant in Botany. 

Lulu Geneva Eldridge, M.A., Assistant in Latin. 

Estella May Fearon, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 

Margaret Clay Ferguson, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. (Permanent.) 

Grace Lillian Filer, B.A., Assistant in Rhetoric and English Com- 
position. 

Hel^ne Amdlie Forest, Lie. hs L., Instructor in French. 

Albert Thomas Foster, Instructor in Violin. 

Mary Marian Fuller, Curator of Chemistry Laboratory. 

Louise Gambrill, B.A., Instructor in French. 

Elisabeth Agnes Germer, Reader in the Department of German. 

Emma Culross Gibbons, Ph.D., Superintendent of Beebe Hall. 

Winifred Goldring, B.A., Graduate Assistant in Geology. 

Sophie Chantal Hart, M.A., Professor of Rhetoric and Compo- 
sition. (Permanent.) 

Marion Wheeler Hartwell, Instructor in Physical Education. 

Florence Emily Hastings, M.A., Instructor in German. 

Laura Hatch, M.A., M.S., Instructor in Geology. 

Margaret Heatley, B.A., Graduate Assistant in Botany. 

Julia Ann Wood Hewitt, B.A., Curator of Zoology Laboratories. 

Mabel Elisabeth Hodder, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

Carrie Maude Holt, M.A., Instructor in Zoology. 

Eleanor Temple Home, B.A., Graduate Assistant in English Liter- 
ature. 

Catharine Sargent Huntington, B.A., Reader in English Composition. 

Emily Josephine Hurd, Instructor in Pianoforte. 

Margaret Johnson, Graduate Assistant in Hygiene and Physical 
Education. 

Amy Kelly, M.A., Instructor in English Language and Composition. 

Florence May Kunkel, B.A., Graduate Assistant in Philosophy and 
Psychology. 

Hazel Kyrk, Ph.B., Instructor in Economics. 

Frederick Henry Lahee, M.A., Instructor in Geology. 

Amy Gertrude Lathe, Cataloguer. 

Stella Mae LeGross, Cataloguer. 

27 



Wellesley College 

Harriet Lester, Superintendent of Siiafer Hall. 

Margaret Little, B.A., Instructor in German. 

Emily Pauline Locke, M.A., Instructor in Botany. 

Percy Waldron Long, Ph.D., Instructor in Rhetoric and Composi- 
tion. 

Helen Willard Lyman, B.A., Superintendent of Stone Hall. 

Helen Hoyt Macartney, B.A., Graduate Assistant in Botany. 

Florence Evelyn McGowan, Superintendent of Domestic Service in 
College Hall. 

Helene Buhlert Magee, B.A., Instructor in Rhetoric and Composi- 
tion. 

Elizabeth Wheeler Manwaring, B.A., Instructor in Rhetoric and 
Composition. 

Antoinette Brigham Putnam Metcalf, M.A., Reference Librarian. 

Edna Virginia Moffett, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

Annie Sybil Montague, M.A., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Albert Pitts Morse, Curator of Zoology Museum and Lecturer on 
Economic Entomology. 

Eliza Jacobus Newkirk, M.A., Instructor in History of Architecture. 

Helen Hawley Nichols, Ph.D., Instructor in Biblical History. 

Isabel Fairbanks Noyes, B.A., Assistant to the Registrar. 

Alice Maria Ottley, M.A., Instructor in Botany. 

Ellen Fitz Pendleton, M.A., Litt.D., President. 

Agnes Frances Perkins, M.A., Associate Professor of Rhetoric and 
Composition. 

Alice Ayers Phillips, Instructor in Pianoforte. 

Nancy May Pond, B.S., B.L.S., Curator of Art Library and Collec- 
tions. 

Laura Post, B.L., Graduate Assistant in Physical Education. 

Frederick Haven Pratt, M.A., M.D., Instructor in Physiology and 
Hygiene. 

Harriet Noyes Randall, M.D., Instructor in Physical Education. 

Katharine Piatt Raymond, B.S., M.D., Resident Physician. 

Alice Robbins, Ph.B., Instructor in French. 

Ethel Dane Roberts, B.A., B.L.S., Assistant Librarian. 

Mabel Louise Robinson, M.A., Instructor in Zoology. 

Sophie Agnes Roche, Graduate Assistant in Physical Education. 

Mary Elida Rust, Superintendent of Noanett House. 

Helen Elizabeth Sanford, Superintendent of College Hospital. 

Miriam Savage, B.A., Graduate Assistant in Art. 

Gusti Schmidt, Instructor in German. 

Alfred Dwight Sheffield, M.A., Instructor in Rhetoric and Compo- 
sition. 

Margaret Calderwood Shields, B.A., Instructor in Physics. 

Ethel Tracy Smith, B.A., Graduate Assistant in Physics. 

Mary Frazer Smith, B.A., Secretary to the Dean. 

28 



Appendix to the President's Report 

Julia Woodhull Smith, Superintendent of Wilder Hall. 

Laetitia Morris Snow, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Mary Snow, Superintendent of Pomeroy Hall. 

Mabel Austin Southard, M.D., Lecturer on Special Hygiene. 

Mary Adeline Stevens, Laboratory Assistant in Botany. 

Louisa Stone Stevenson, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 

Mabel Annie Stone, B.A., Curator of Botany Museum and Assistant 
in Laboratories. 

Muriel Streibert, B.A., B.D., Instructor in Biblical History. 

Ethel Van Zandt Sullivan, B.A., Instructor in Rhetoric and Compo- 
sition. 

Dagny Gunhilda Sunne, Ph.D., Instructor in History and Principles 
of Education. 

Marjorie Follansbee Sutcliffe, B.S., Library Assistant. 

Eva Fanny Swift, Superintendent of Crofton House and Ridgeway 
Refectory. 

Edith Winthrop Mendall Taylor, B.A., Instructor in Rhetoric and 
Composition. 

Mabel Tidball, Instructor in Drawing. 

Jennie Tilt, M.S., Assistant in Chemistry. 

Edith Estelle Torrey, Instructor in V^ocal Music. 

Sara Frances Tupper, B.A., Graduate Assistant in Italian. 

Julia Emery Turner, M.A., Superintendent of Fiske Cottage. 

Ida Florence Underbill, B.A., Cataloguer. 

Roxana Hay ward Vivian, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 

Alice Walton, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Latin and Archaeology. 

Lilla Weed, B.A., Second Assistant Librarian. 

Laura Adella Welch, B.A., Secretary to Director of Halls of Resi- 
dence. 

Dorothea Wells, B.A., Corresponding Secretary to the Dean. 

Elizabeth Burroughs Wheeler, Superintendent of Eliot Cottage. 

Hetty Shepard Wheeler, M.A., Instructor in Musical Theory. 

Elizabeth Phebe Whiting, Curator of the Whitin Observatory. 

Charlotte Scott Whiton, Purveyor. 

Maude Cipperly Wiegand, B.A., Instructor in Botany. 

Edna Lois Williams, Instructor in Physical Education. 

Eleanor Densmore Wood, M.A., Instructor in Biblical History. 

Sarah Jones Woodward, B.A., Assistant in Psychology. 

Euphemia Richardson Worthington, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathe- 
matics. 

Mabel Minerva Young, M.A., Instructor in Mathematics. 



29 



Wellesley College 

GIFTS, 1910-1911 

From the family of Mr. A. H. Hardy two stone settings for drinking 

fountains, to be known as the Sylvia fountains. 
From the heirs of the late Rev. Frederic West Holland of Concord, 

Mass., a portrait on ivory of Harriet Martineau. 
A portrait of Mrs. Julia J. Irvine, by Gari Melchers, from the class of 

1S95 of which Mrs. Irvine was an honorary member. 
Specimens of natural mass copper from Mrs. Quincy A. Shaw. 
Fine cabinets for recent gifts of minerals, designed by the Boston 

Museum of Fine Arts, from Mrs Henry Fowle Durant. 
A portrait of the late Anne Eugenia F. Morgan, Professor of Philoso- 
phy, 1876-1900, the nucleus of a collection commemorative of 

Miss Morgan's life and work to be placed in the old library room, 

the gift of the Alumnae Association. 
"Listening," an oil painting by Gross Claude, from Mr. Edward M. 

Raj'mond. 
One hundred collotype reproductions of the works of Montonobu 

also from Mr. Raymond. 
Bronze lamps for the front of the library from the class of 1880. 
Bronze doors for the library, dedicated to the memory of the late Eben 

Norton Horsford of Cambridge, Mass., designed by Evelyn B. 

Longman, a gift from the class of 1SS6, of which Mr. Horsford 

was honorary member. 
The complete works of Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, 

mainly in first editions, 83 volumes, from Professor George H. 

Palmer. 
Various United States documents from Senator William Murray 

Crane and the Hon. John D. Weeks. 
The Notebooks of Shelley from the originals in the library of W. K. 

Bixby, edited by H. B. Forman, from Mr. Bixby. 
The Rara Arithmetica, a catalogue of the arithmetics written before 

1601, from Mr. George A. Plimpton. 

From Mrs. William R. Taylor, to be used at discretion . . . $100.00 

From Mrs. Charles P. Davidson, to be used at discretion . 200.00 

From the estate of Ellen A. Kendall 355-64 

From Mr. Horace D. Williams, Ethel HowlandFolger Wil- 
liams Memorial Scholarship 

For alumnae endowment fund 995'6o 

From Ex-President Caroline Hazard for Three Sisters 

Choir Fund 1,00000 

From Elsa D. James, 1906, Sophie Jewett Memorial 

Scholarship i ,000.00 

From the class of 1S96 for the Julia J. Irvine Professorship 700.00 

From the estate of John Stewart Kennedy 45,000.00 

30 



Appendix to the President's Report 

SUNDAY SERVICES. 

September 25, Rev. James Austin Richards, Boston, Mass. 

October 2, Rev, Edward M. Nojes, D.D., Newton Centre, Mass. 

October 9, Rev. L. Clark Seelje, D.D., Northampton, Mass. 

October 9, Rev. Henry Sloan Coffin, New York City. 

October 16, Rev. Charles S. Mills, D.D., St. Louis, Mo. 

October 16, Rev. J. D. Jones, Bournemouth, England. 

October 23, Rev. O. P Gifford, D.D., Brookline, Mass. 

October 30, (Rev.) Dean George Hodges, Episcopal Theological 
School, Cambridge, Mass. 

November 6, (Rev.) President Albert Parker Fitch, Andover Theo- 
logical Seminary, Cambridge, Mass. 

November 13, Rev. William R. Taylor, D.D., Rochester, N. Y. 

November 20, Rt. Rev. Ethelbert Talbot, Bishop of Central Penn- 
sylvania. 

November 27, Mr. Robert E. Speer, New York City. 

December 4, Rev. Cleland B. McAfee, D.D., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

December 11, Rev. Lyman Abbott, D.D., New York City. 

January 8, Rt. Rev. William Lawrence, D.D., Boston, Mass. 

January 15, Rev. Willis H. Butler, Northampton, Mass. 

January 22, Rev. Henry van Dyke, D.D., Princeton, N. J. 

January 29, Rev. Herbert A. Jump, New Britain, Conn. 

February 5, Rev. William E. Strong, Newtonville, Mass. 

February 12, Rev. Ferdinand Q. Blanchard, East Orange, N. J. 

February 19, (Rev.) President William DeW. Hyde, Bowdoin 
College. 

February 26, Rt. Rev. Arthur C. A. Hall, Bishop of Vermont. 

March 5, (Rev.) Professor Edward C. Moore, Harvard University. 

March 12, Rev. Oscar E. Maurer, New Haven, Conn. 

March 19, Rev. John McDowell, Newark, N. J. 

April 9, Rev. Charles G. Sewall, Albany, N. Y. 

April 16, Rev. Henry S. Nash, D.D., Episcopal Theological School, 
Cambridge, Mass. 

April 23, Rev. J. Edgar Park, West Newton, Mass. 

April 30, Rev. G. Glenn Atkins, Providence, R. L 

May 7, Rev. N. W. Cadwell, D.D., Atlantic City, N. J. 

May 14, Rev. Edward F. Sanderson, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

]May 21, Rev. Edmund S. Rousmaniere, D.D., Boston, Mass. 

May 21, (Rev.) Professor Hugh Black, New York City. 

May 28, Rev. Rockwell H. Potter, Hartford, Conn. 

June 4, (Rev.) Professor Henry Hallam Tweedy, Yale University. 

June II, Rev. Raymond Calkins, Portland, Me. 

June 18, Rev, Henry Sloan Coffin, New York City. 



31 



Wellesley College 

MUSIC. 

November 7, Song Recital by Madame Corinne Rider-Kelsey and 
Mr. Claude Cunningham, assisted by Mr. Alfred DeVoto, 
Accompanist. 

November 21, Robert Schumann Centenary Recital by Mrs. Stella 
Hadden Alexander. 

December 6, Faculty Concert. Miss Alice A. Cummings, Piano ; 
Mr. Albert T. Foster, Violin. 

December 11, Christmas Vespers. The Wellesley College Choir 
(solos by Mi»s Murray, Miss Pursell, Miss Smart, Miss Goss), 
assisted by Miss Harriet Shaw^, Harpist; Mr. Albert T. Foster, 
Violinist. Professor Macdougall, Organist. 

January 10, Vocal Recital by Miss Edith Estelle Torrey, assisted by 
Mr. C. G. Hamilton, Accompanist; Mr. A. T. Foster, Violinist. 

January 16, Piano Recital by Madame Liza Lehmann, assisted by 
Miss Blanche Tomlin, Soprano ; Miss Palgrave-Turner, Con- 
tralto ; Mr. Hubert Eisdell, Tenor; Mr. Julien Henry, Baritone. 

January 24, Recital by Professor George C. Vieh. 

February 6, Piano Recital by Mr. Xaver Scharwenka. 

February 14, Faculty Concert. Professor H. C. Macdougall, Piano; 
Mr. Albert T. Foster, Violin. 

February 28, A Melodrame "Enoch Arden. " Miss Lillian Drouet, 
Reader; Mr. Clarence G. Hamilton, Pianist. 

March 7, Faculty Concert. Piano Recital by Miss Emily J. Hurd, 
assisted by Mr. Frank S. Currier, Violinist. 

April 16, Easter Vespers. The Wellesley College Choir, assisted by 
The Hoffman String Quartette. Mr. Jacques Hoffman, First 
Violin; Mr. Adolf Bak, Second Violin; Mr. Karl Rissland, 
Viola; Mr. Carl Barth, Violoncello. Professor Macdougall, 
Organist. 

April iS, Pianoforte Recital by Mrs. W. L. Taylor. 

May 15, Concert by the Wellesley College Orchestra (Mr. Albert 
T. Foster, Conductor), assisted by Miss Mary Welles and Miss 
Marion Long, Violinists; Miss Ruth A. Howe, Soprano. 

May 16, Organ Recital by the New England Chapter of the Ameri- 
can Guild of Organists of the United States and Canada. 
Organists assisting, Mr. W. J. Clemson, Mr. George A. Bur- 
dett, Mr. John Hermann Loud, Professor Macdougall. 

June 18, Baccalaureate Vespers. The Wellesley College Choir 
(Miss Alice Smart, Soloist), assisted by Mr. Albert T. Foster, 
Violinist; Mr. Heinrich Schuecker, Harpist. Professor Mac- 
dougall, Organist. 



32 



Appendix to the President's Report 
ADDRESSES 

BEFORE THE CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

October 2, The Edinburgh Conference. Dr. Samuel B. Capen. 
October 6, Kobe College, Japan. Miss Susan A. Searle. 
October 13, Jesus as a Church Member. Rev. Henry Sloan Coffin. 
October 20, The Study of Missions. Rev. Brewer Eddy. 
November 6, The Work of our College Missionary. Dr. Robert A. 

Hume of Ahmednagar, India. 
November 27, The Need of South America. Mr. Robert E. Speer. 
January 15, The Opportunity in China. Miss Frances L. Taft. 
February 5, The World in Boston. Mr. A. M. Gardner. 
February 19, College Women in Settlement Work. Mrs. Lucia H. 

Thayer. 
February 19-March 3, Vesper services: Addresses by Professor 

Kendrick, Dr. Talcott Williams of Philadelphia, Rev. Frederick 

C. Lauderburn of Boston, Rev. J. Edgar Park of West Newton, 

Professor Bates. 
March 2, Address by Rev. Harry E. Fosdick, Montclair, N. J. 
March 5, After Ellis Island, What? Miss Miriam L. Woodberry. 
March 12, Prison Work. Mrs. Ballington Booth. 
March 19, The New Woman of the Orient. Mrs. Helen Barrett 

Montgomery. 

Other Lectures, Services, and Readings. 

September 25, Service in memory of Mr. Henry Fowle Durant. Ad- 
dress by Mrs. Anna Stockbridge Tuttle. 
November 9, The Fletcher Kindergarten Method. Mrs. Evelyn 

Fletcher Capp. 
November 12, Open Meeting of English Departments commemorative 

of William Vaughan Moody. 
November iS, The Religious Philosophy of Rousseau. Professor A. 

C. Armstrong of Wesleyan University. 
November 20, Address by Mr. Meyer Bloomfield at the invitation of 

the Wellesley Chapter of the College Settlements Association. 
November 28, Woman Suffrage. Address by Mrs. Swinburne Hale. 
November 28, L'Art Grec et I'art Romain. M. Fougeres. 
December 2, William Sharp's Conception of the Training necessary 

for a Writer. Mrs. William Sharp. 
December 4, War and Manhood. President David Starr Jordan. 
December 5, Excavations in Crete. Dr. Edith H. Hall. 
December 8, The Appreciation of Painting. Dr. George Santayana. 
December 9, The Sociological Significance of the Home Economics 

Movement. Mrs. Ellen H. Richards. 

33 



Wellesley College 

January 9, The Preparation of the High School Teacher. Professor 
Paul H. Hanus, Harvard University. 

January 11, Master Builders of Ancient Rome. Dr. Jesse B. Carter. 

January 17, Roman Africa. Professor Hawes. 

January 30, Double-Star Systems. Professor Robert J. Aitken, Lick 
Observatory, California. 

January 31, Thirty Years of German Literature. Baron Wolzagen. 

February 13, Wonders of Photography. Mr. H. Snovrden Ward of 
Hadlow, Kent, England. 

February 20, Reading of Maeterlinck's The Blue Bird. Miss 
Frances Nevin. 

February 27, An Investigation of the Tailoring Establishments in 
Boston. Mrs. Jessie Gould Hallowell. 

February 28, The Special High School and the Special Course in the 
General High School. Professor Frank W. Ballou of the Univer- 
sity of Cincinnati. 

February 28, Importance of Animal Experimentation on Medical Re- 
search. Open Meeting of the Science Club. (Professor W. B. 
Cannon, Harvard Medical School. Ex-President Charles W. 
Eliot, Harvard University.) 

March 4, Equal Suffrage. (At invitation of the Equal Suffrage 
League.) Dr. Anna H. Shaw. 

March 6, The Place and Value of Practical Music in the College Curric- 
ulum. Associate Professor Charles H. Farnsworth of Columbia 
University. 

March 11, Elizabethan Schoolbooks ; exhibition and address by Mr. 
George A. Plimpton. 

March 13, Reading from Kipling's works. Mr. Henry J. Hadfield. 

March 14, Flying Machines. Dr. Arthur G. Webster of Clark 
University. 

March 15, Cherchel, North Africa: the Romance of the Daughter of 
Antony and Cleopatra. Mr. Richard Fuller, Boston. 

March 16, The Domestic Life of the Elizabethans. Miss Anna 
Beecher Scoville. 

March 17, The Development of the Color Sense. Professor J. W. 
Baird of Clark University. 

March 20, Reading from Dickens' Bleak House, by Mr. Leland T. 
Powers. 

March 22, The New Basis of Method. Assistant Professor Henry W. 
Holmes, Harvard University. 

March 22, Recent Astronomical Photography with the Sixty-inch Re- 
flector at Mt. Wilson Observatory. Professor G. W. Ritchey of 
Mt. Wilson Solar Observatory, California. 

April 7, Character-building in the public schools. Mrs. Richard C 
Cabot. 



34 



Appendix to the President's Report 

April lO, Reading from Ibsen's The Master Builder. Mrs. E. 

Charlton Black. 
April II, The Meaning of the Messiahship of Jesus. Professor James 

H. Ropes, Harvard University. 
April 12, The Sources of Mark. Professor Ropes. 
April 12, The Influence of Balzac in determining the Literary form of 

the Novel. Mrs. H. A. Davidson. 
April 23, Bible Centenary. Reading by Professor Bennett. 
April 28, The Ideal in Art. Dr. George Santayana of Harvard 

University. 
May I, Why Education in America is Difficult. Professor Elwood P. 

Cubberly, Leland Stanford Jr. University. 
May 9, Liquid Air. Professor Walter P. Bradley, Wesleyan 

University. 
May 18 and 19, The Later Teachings of Judaism. Professor Charles F. 

Kent. 

June II, College Women and Settlement Work. Miss Jane Addams. 

June 20, Commencement Address. The College Graduate and Public 
Needs. Mr. John F. Moors. 



35 



APPENDIX TO THE DEAN'S REPORT 



Description of courses 1910-1911, with the number of 
hours per week and number of divisions, the name of each 
instructor, and the number and rank of students in each 
course. 

ART. 

1. History of Architecture from the Classic period through the 

Renaissance. Two divisions, three hours a week each ; one 
year. E. J. Newkirk. Sen. 5, Jun 13, Soph. 10. Total 28. 

2. Outline History of Greek Sculpture. One division, three hours 

a week ; one year. Associate Professor Abbot. L. D. Caskey. 
Sen. 2, Jun. 3. Totals. 

3. History of Italian Painting through the Fifteenth Century. Two 

divisions, three or four hours a week each; one year. Asso- 
ciate Professor Abbot. Jun. 15, Soph. 13, Fr. 21. Total 49. 

4. Certain phases of Italian Renaissance Architecture. One division, 

three hours a week; one year. E.J. Newkirk. Sen. 2, Jun. i. 
Total 3. 

5. Studio Practice. One division, one hour a week; one year. 

E. J. Newkirk. Sen. 3, Jun. 7, Soph. 13. Total 23. 
10. History of Italian Painting during the High Renaissance. One 
division, three hours a week; one year. Professor Brown. 
Associate Professor Abbot. Sen. 3. 

13. Introductory Course in the History of Art. Two divisions, three 

hours a week each ; one year. Professor Brown. Associate 
Professor Abbot. E. J. Newkirk. Sen. 68. 

14. Studio Practice. One division, one hour a week; one year. Pro- 

fessor Brown. E. F. Comins. Sen. i,Jun. 11. Total 12. 
16. Studio Practice. One division, two hours a week; one year. 
Associate Professor Abbot. Grad. 2, Sen. 6. Total 8. 



ASTRONOMY. 

I. Physical Astronomy. Three divisions, three hours a week each ; 
one year. Professor Whiting. L. B. Allen. Sen. 29, Jun. 
iS, Soph. 18. Total 65. 

36 



Appendix to the Dean's Report 

2. General Astronomy. One division, three hours a week ; one 
year. Professor Hayes. M.W.Daley. Sen. i, Jun. 2, Soph. 
ID, Sp. I. Total 14. 

3 and 4. Practical Astronomy. Celestial Mechanics. One division, 
three hours a week; one year. Professor Hayes. Grad 2. 

5. Elementary Astrophysics. One division, three hours a week ; one 

year. Professor Whiting. Sen. 2. 

6. Variable Stars. One division, one hour a week; one year. Pro- 

fessor Whiting. Grad. i. 



BIBLICAL HISTORY, LITERATURE AND INTERPRETATION. 

I. HEBREW. 

(Withdrawn for the year.) 

II. BIBLICAL HISTORY. 

I. Studies in Hebrew History from the settlement of Canaan to the 
Roman period. Six divisions, two hours a week each ; one year. 
K. Wheelock. M. Streibert. Sen. i, Jun. iS, Soph. 141, Fr. 14. 
Total 174. 

3. The Development of Thought in the New Testament. Two divi- 

sions, three hours a week each; one year. Professor Kendrick. 
Sen. 7, Jun. 48, Soph. 2, Sp. i. Total 58. 

4. The Life of Christ. Five divisions, two hours a week each. One 

year. E. D. Wood. Sen. 21, Jun. 181, Soph. 2. Total 204. 

5. Greek Testament I. Text Study of the Gospels. One division, 

two hours a week ; one year. Professor Chapin. Sen. 2, Jun. 
5. Total 7. 
S. Life of Paul. One division, two hours a week ; one year. 

K. Wheelock. Sen. 8, Jun. 17, Soph. i. Total 26. 
9. History of Religions. One division, three hours a week; one 
year. Associate Professor Locke. Sen. 16. 

10. The Development of Thought in the Old Testament. Four divi- 
sions, three hours a week each ; one year. Associate Professor 
Locke. M. Streibert. Jun. i, Soph. 114, Fr. 9. Total 124. 

12. The Johannine Literature. One division, two hours a week; one 
year. Professor Kendrick. Sen. 4, Jun. 11. Total 15. 



BOTANY. 

General Botany. Three divisions, three hours a week each ; one 
year. Professor Ferguson. Associate Professor Wiegand. 
Associate Professor Riddle. A. M. Ottley. Sen. i, Jun. 11, 
Soph. 34, Fr. 1. Total 47. 

37 



Weli.esley College 

2. Taxonomy of the Algse, Bryophytes, and Pteridophytes. One divi- 

sion, three hours a week ; one year. Associate Professor Riddle. 
Grad. i, Sen. 4, Jun. 13. Total iS. 

3. Taxonomy and Geographical Distribution of the Phanerogams. 

Two divisions, three hours a week each ; one year. Associate 
Professor Wiegand. M. C. Wiegand. Sen. 11, Jun. 9. Total 
20. 

4. Bacteria, Yeast, and Moulds in the Home. Three divisions, one 

hour a week each ; one year. Associate Professor Riddle. Dr. 
Snow. Sen. 15, Jun. 15, Soph. 6, Fr. 2. Total 38. 

5. Plant Studies. Eleven divisions, three hours a week each; one 

year. Professor Ferguson, four hours. M. C Bliss, fifteen 
hours. M. C. Wiegand, fifteen hours. A. M. Ottley, ten hours. 
Dr. Snow, ten hours. M. A. Stone, five hours. Jun. i, Soph. 
40, Fr. 198. Total 239. 
7. Plant Problems. One division, three hours a week; one year. 
Professor Ferguson. Grad. i. 

12. General Horticulture and Elementary Landscape Gardening. One 

division, three hours a week; one year. M. K. Babcock. Sen. 
5, Tun. 12. Total 17. 

13. Comparative Morphology, Embryology, and Histologj-. Two 

divisions, three hours a week; one year. Professor Ferguson. 
E. P. Locke. Sen. 9, Jun. 7. Total 16. 



CHEMISTRY. 

1. General Chemistry. Three divisions, three hours a week each; 

one year. Associate Professor Bragg. H. S. French. Grad. i, 
Sen. 4, Jun. 18, Soph. 17, Fr. 48. Total 88. 

2. Qualitative Analysis. One division, three hours a week. One 

semester. J. Tilt. Sen. 2, Jun. 3, Soph. 6, Fr. 2. Total 13. 

4. Advanced General Chemistry. One division, three hours a week; 

one year. Professor Roberts. J. Tilt. Grad. 1, Jun. i. 
Soph. 4, Fr. 7. Total 13. 

5. Qiiantitative Analysis. One division, three hours a week; one 

semester. J. Tilt. Sen. 2, Jun. 3, Soph. 6, Fr. i. Total 12. 

6. Air, Water, and Food Analysis. One division, three hours a week ; 

one semester. Associate Professor Bragg. Grad. i. Sen. 9. 
Total 10. 

7. Organic Chemistry. Advanced Course. One division, three 

hours a week ; one year. Professor Roberts. H. S. French. 
Sen. 3, Jun. 12. Total 15. 

8. Theoretical Chemistry. One division, three hours a week; one 

semester. Professor Roberts. Grad. i, Sen. 7. Total 8. 

38 



Appendix to the Dean's Report 

9. Selected Subjects in Theoretical and Physical Chemistry, with 
laboratory work in the determination of vapor densities and 
molecular weights. One division, three hours a week: one 
semester. Professor Roberts. Grad. i, Sen. 4. Total 5. 

10. Advanced Laboratory Course. One division, three hours a week; 

one semester. Professor Roberts. Grad. i, Sen. 2. Total 3. 

11. Historical Chemistry. One division, three hours a week; one 

semester. Professor Roberts. Sen. 3, Soph. i. Total 4. 

12. Elementary Inorganic Chemistry. One division, three hours a 

week; one semester. H. S. French. Sp. 17. 



ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY. 

1. Elements of Economics. Two divisions, two hours a week each: 

one year. E. J. Hutchinson. Sen. 6, Jun. 16, Soph. 47, Fr. 5, 
Sp. I. Total 75. 

2. Industrial History of the United States. One division, three hours 

a week; one year. Dr. Youngman. Sen. 4, Jun. 4. Total S. 

3. Industrial History of England. One division, three hours a week; 

one semester. Associate Professor Balch. Sen. i, Jun. 6, 
Soph. 2, Fr. I. Total 10. 

6. Social Economics I. Two divisions, three hours a week each: 

one semester. E. J. Hutchinson. Grad. i, Sen. 47, Jun. 9. 
Total 57. 

7. Social Economics II. Two divisions, three hours a week each ; 

one semester. E. J. Hutchinson. Grad. i. Sen. 40, Jun. 7. 
Total 4S. 
S. Labor Movement. One division, three hours a week; one semes- 
ter. Associate Professor Balch. Sen. 10. Jun. 15, Soph, 2, 
Fr. I. Total 28. 
10. Immigration. Two divisions, three hours a week each ; one se- 
mester. Associate Professor Balch. Sen. 23, Jun. 37, Soph. 3. 
Total 63. 

12. The Trust Problem. One division, three hours a week ; one se- 

mester. Dr. Youngman. Sen. 10, Jun. 9. Total 19. 

13. Selected Industries. One division, one hour a week; one year. 

Dr. Youngman. Sen. i, Jun. 8, Soph. 14. Fr. 2. Total 25. 

15. History of Economic Theory. Two divisions, three hours a week 

each; one semester. Associate Professor Balch. Sen. 41, Jun. 
54, Soph. 2. Total 97. 

16. Money and Banking. One division, three hours a week; one 

semester. Dr. Youngman. Sen. i. Jun. 3. Total 4. 

17. Economics of Consumption. One division, three hours a week; 

one semester. Associate Professor Balch. Sen. 4, Jun. 5, 
Soph. I. Total 10. 

39 



Wellesley College 



19. The Distribution of Wealth. One division, three hours a week; 
one semester. Dr. Youngman. Sen.2,Jun. 5. Total 7. 



EDUCATION. 

3. Introduction to Experimental Pedagogy. One division, three 

hours a week; one year. Professor McKeag. Sen. 9. 

4. Secondary Education. One division, three hours a week; one 

year. Professor McKeag. Dr. Drew. Dr. Brown. Grad. 5. 
6. Introductory Course in Education. Four divisions, three hours a 
week each; one year. Professor McKeag. Grad. 2, Sen. loi, 
Jun. 15, Sp. 2. Total 120. 



ELOCUTION. 

1. Training of the Body and Voice. Three divisions, two hours a 

week each; one year. Professor Bennett. L. Drouet. Sen. 
17, Jun. 14, Soph. 52, Fr. i. Total 84. 

2. Training of the Body and Voice. Expression. One division, 

three hours a week ; one year. Professor Bennett. L. Drouet. 
Sen. 5, Jun. 12. Total 17. 

3. Reading of Shakespeare. One division, two hours a week ; one 

year. Professor Bennett. L. Drouet. Sen. 9, Jun. 4. Total 13. 



ENGLISH. 

I. ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

1. Outline History of English Literature. Seven divisions, three 

hours a week each ; one year. Associate Professor Conant. 
E. Church. Jun. 33, Soph. 90, Fr. 99. Total 222. 

2. American Authors. Two divisions, three hours a week each; one 

year. Associate Professor Young. Sen. 38, Jun. 28, Soph. iS. 
Total 84. 

4. Milton. Two divisions, three hours a week each; one year. 

Associate Professor Lockwood. Sen. 24, Jun. 64, Soph. 17. 
Sp. I. Total 106. 

5. The Literary History of Prose Forms in the Essay. One division, 

two hours a week; one semester. Professor Waite. Sen. 3, 
Jun. 2, Soph. 5. Total 10. 

6. Victorian Prose. One division, three hours a week; one 3'ear. 

Professor Scudder. Grad. i. Sen. 53, Jun, 23. Total 77. 

7. Nineteenth Century Poetry. Two divisions, three hours a week 

each; one year. Associate Professor Sherwood. Sen. 46, Jun. 
8, Soph. I. Total 55. 

40 



Appendix to the Dean's Report 

8. English Literature of the Fourteenth Century. Two divisions, 

three hours a week each ; one year. Associate Professor Shack- 
ford. Sen. 4, Jun. 15, Soph. 45, Fr. i. Total 65. 

9. English Drama. Shakespeare. Two divisions, three hours a 

week each ; one year. Professor Bates. Sen. 25, Jun. 28, Sp. i. 
Total 54. 
10. Historical Development of English Literature. One division, 
three hours a week ; one year. Professor Scudder. Grad. 2, 
Sen. 10. Total 12. 

12. Critical Problems of the Literature of the Fourteenth Century. 

One division, three hours a week; one year. Associate Pro- 
fessor Shackford. Grad5, Sen. 5, Sp. i. Total 11. 

13. Social Ideals in English Letters. One division, one hour a week ; 

one year. Professor Scudder. Sen. 10, Jun. 25, Soph. 34. 
Total 69. 

14. English Masterpieces. One division, three hours a week; one 

year. Associate Professor Young. Sen. 12, Jun. i. Total 13. 

15. Dryden andPope. One division, three hours a week; one year. 

E. Church. Sen. i, Jun. 5, Soph. i. Total 7. 
19. Literary History of Verse Forms. One division, two hours a week ; 
one semester. Professor Waite. Sen. i, Jun. 3, Soph. 5. 
Total 9. 

22. English Romanticism. One division, three hours a week ; one 

year. Associate Professor Sherwood. Grad. 4, Sen. 7. 
Total II. 

23. Critical Problems of Elizabethan Literature. One division, three 

hours a week ; one year. Professor Bates. Grad. 7. 

24. Critical Problems of American Literature. One division, three 

hours a week; one 3'ear. Associate Professor Young. Sen. 2, 
Jun. 2. Total 4. 

II. ENGLISH COMPOSITION. 

1. The Elements and Qualities of Style. First semester; exposi- 

tion; description; narration. Weekly themes. Second se- 
mester ; critical study of the essay and of the structure of the 
short story. Fortnightly themes. Fourteen divisions, two 
hours a week each ; one year. Dr. Burnham. A. F. Perkins. 
E. W. Manwaring. A. Kelly. E. B. Pope. H. B. Magee. 
E. R. Hooker. Soph. 11, Fr. 411, Sp. i. Total 423. 

2. Critical Exposition and Argumentation. Six divisions, two hours 

a week each ; one year. Dr. Burnham. E. W. M. Taylor. J. 
H. Batchelder. Dr. Gorham. Sen. 2, Jun. 12, Soph. 190, 
Fr. 17, Sp. 2. Total 233. 
4. Critical Exposition and Argumentation. Advanced Course. Two 
divisions, three hours a week each ; one year. Professor Waite. 
E. W. M. Taylor. Jun. 2, Soph. 69, Fr. 2. Total 73. 

41 



Wellesley College 

5. General Survey. One division, one hour a week; one year. Dr. 

Burnham. Sp. 16. 

6. Long and Short Themes. Two divisions, two hours a week each ; 

one year. Professor Hart. E. W. Manwaring. Sen. 26, Jun. 
53, Soph. I, Sp. I. Total Si. 

7. Practical Exposition. (For students in the Department of Hy- 

giene and Physical Education.) One division, one hour a week ; 

one year. H. B. Magee. Sp. 23. 
10. The Theory and History of Criticism. One division, one hour a 

week; one year. Professor Hart. Sen. 30, Jun, 9. Total 39. 
16. Advanced Course in English Composition. One division, two 

hours a week ; one year. Professor Hart. Grad. i, Sen. 9, Jun. 

I. Total II. 

III. ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 

1. Old English. Elementary Course. One division, three hours a 

week ; one j'ear. Associate Professor Lockwood. Sen. 7, Jun. 
3, Soph. 2. Total 12. 

2. Old and Middle English. One division, three hours a week : one 

year. A. Kelley. Sen. 2, Jun. 4. Total 6. 

3. History of the English Language. One division, three hours a 

week; one year. Professor Waite. Sen. 12, Jun. 4, Sp. i. 
Total 17. 

4. Seminar in Old English. One division, three hours a week; one 

3'ear. Associate Professsor Lockwood. Grad. 6, Sen. 3. 
Total 9. 



FRENCH. 

Elementary Course. Grammar, reading, composition, exercises 
in speaking. Four divisions, three hours a week each ; one 
year. M. E. Bowler. Sen. i, Jun. i, Soph. 17, Fr. 60. Total 

79- 

Continuation of i. Readings from contemporary authors. Four 
divisions, three hours a week each; one year. J. Cheron. 
M. E. Bowler. L. Gambrill. Jun. 4, Soph. 6, Fr. 77, Sp. i. 
Total 88. 

Intermediate Course. Studies in French Idioms and Structure. 
Four divisions, one hour a week each; one year. M. O. Car- 
ret. J. Cheron. Soph, i, Fr. 103, Sp. x. Total 105. 

Intermediate Course. General survey of French Literature with 
reading of thirty-five authors. Four divisions, two hours a 
week each; one year. M. O. Carret. J. Cheron. Soph. 3, 
Fr. xoi. Total 104. 

42 



Appendix to the Dean's Report 

6. Paris as a Centre of French Thoughts and Ideals. One division, 

one hour a week ; one year. Professor Colin. Sen. 5, Jun. i. 
Total 6. 

7. Advanced Composition. Essay Work and Journal Club. Three 

divisions, one hour a week each; one year. J. Cheron. 
Sen. 2, Jun. 10, Soph. 24, Fr. 3. Total 39. 
9. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. One division, three hours 
a week; one year. H. A. Forest. Sen. 1, Jun 3. Total 4. 

10. Literature of the Nineteenth Century. One division, three hours 

a week; one year. M. O. Carret. Sen. 13, Jun. 5, Soph, i, 
Sp. 2. Total 21. 

11. Old French and Old French Literature. One division, three 

hours a week ; one year. Professor Colin. Grad. 2, Sen. 5. 
Total 7. 

12. The Drama of the Seventeenth Century. One division, three 

hours a week; one year. Professor Colin. Sen. 6, Jun. 17. 
Total 23. 

14. French Literature in the Sixteenth Century. One division, one 

hour a week; one year. H.A.Forest. Sen. i, Jun. 2. Total 3. 

15. Literary Movement in France during the second half of the 

Nineteenth Century. One division, three hours a week ; one 

year. Professor Colin. Sen. 3, Jun. 2. Total 5. 
17. Letters of Madame de Stjvigne and Fables of Lafontaine. One 

division, one hour a week; one year. J. Cheron. Jun. 2, 

Soph. 17. Total 19. 
19. French Social Life and Manners. Three divisions, two hours a 

week each; one year. M. O. Carret. J. Cheron. H.A.Forest. 

Jun. 6, Soph. 33, Fr. 3, Sp. 8. Total 50. 

24. Oral Composition. Two divisions, one hour a week each ; one 

year. H.A.Forest. Sen. 2, Jun. 3, Soph. 19, Fr. i. Total 25. 

25. Modern French Critics ^in Literature and Art. M. O. Carret. 

One division, one hour a week ; one year. Sen. 3, Jun. 6. Total9. 

29. History of French Literature. Two divisions, two hours a week 

each; one year. H. A. Forest. Sen. 2, Jun. 4, Soph. 26, Fr. 1. 
Total 33. 

30. Studies in Style. One division, two hours a week: one year. 

M. O. Carret. Sen. 3, Jun. i. Total 4. 



GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY. 

Geology. Three divisions, three hours a week each; one year. 

Professor Fisher. F. H. Lahee. R. W. Raeder. Sen. 17, Jun. 

14, Soph. iS, Fr. 6. Total 55. 
Mineralogy. One division, three hours a week; one semester. 

F. H. Lahee. Grad. i, Sen. 2, Jun. i. Total 4. 



43 



Wellesley College 

Advanced Geography. Two divisions, three hours a week each ; 

one year. Professor Fisher. W. Goldring. Sen. 5, Jun. 9, 

Soph. 13, Fr. 2. Total 29. 
Petrology. One division, three hours a week; one semester. 

F. H. Lahee. Grad. i. Sen. 2, Jun. i. Total 4. 



GERMAN. 

1. Elementary Course. Grammar, prose composition, conversation, 

reading, memorizing poetry. Three divisions, three hours a 
week each; one year. Associate Professor SchoU, three hours. 
M. Cogswell, three hours. L. G. Eldridge, three hours. 
Grad. i, Soph. 10, Fr. 32, Sp. i. Total 44. 

2. Continuation of i. One division, three hours a week ; one year. 

F. E. Hastings. Jun. 4, Soph. 11. Sp. i. Total 16. 

4. Intermediate Course. Four divisions, three hours a week each ; 

one year. F. E. Hastings, three hours. M. Cogswell, three 
hours. M. Little, six hours. Sen. i, Jun. i. Soph. 5, Fr. 76. 
Total 83. 

5. Grammar and Composition. Intermediate Course. Six divi- 

sions, one hour a week each ; one year. G. Schmidt, two 
hours. M. Little, four hours. Fr. 133. 

6. Grammar and " Freie Reproduction." One division, three hours 

a week; one semester. F. E. Hastings. Sen. 5, Jun. 5. 
Total 10. 

8. Grammar and Composition. Advanced Course. Two divisions, 

one hour a week each ; one year. Associate Professor Wip- 
plinger, one hour. Associate Professor Scholl, one hour. 
Jun. 12, Soph. 35, Fr. i, Sp. i. Total 49. 

9. History of the German Language. One division, one hour a week ; 

one year. Associate Professor Wipplinger. Sen. 7, Jun. 5. 
Total 12. 

10. Outline History of German Literature. Six divisions, two hours 

a week each ; one year. Professor Miiller, two hours. 

G. Schmidt, four hours. M. Little, six hours. Fr. 133. 

11. Goethe's Life and Works. Introductory Course. Four divi- 

sions, three hours a week each ; one semester. Professor Miil- 
ler. Associate Professor Scholl. G. Schmidt. Sen. 2, Jun. 
30, Soph. 55, Fr. 3. Total 90. 

12. Nineteenth Century Drama. One division, two hours a week; 

one year. Associate Professor Scholl. Sen. 6, Jun. 6. 
Total 12. 

13. The German Novel. One division, two hours a week; one year. 

G. Schmidt. Sen. 3, Jun. 3, Soph, i, Fr. i. Total 8. 

44 



Appendix to the Dean's Report 

15. History of German Literature. Three divisions, two hours a 

week each ; one semester. Associate Professor VVipplinger, 
two hours. Associate Professor Scholl, four hours. Jun. 12, 
Soph. 35, Fr. I, Sp. I. Total 49. 

16. History of German Literature. Two divisions, two hours a 

week each ; one semester. Associate Professor Wipplinger. 
Associate Professor Scholl. Jun. 12, Soph. 33, Sp. 2. Total 47. 

18. The German Romantic School. Two divisions, three hours a 

week each; one semester. Associate Professor Wipplinger. 
Sen. 7, Jun. 24. Total 31. 

19. Lessing as Dramatist and Critic. Two divisions, three hours a 

week each; one semester. Professer Miiller. Sen. 8, Jun. 30. 
Total 38. 

20. Schiller as Philosopher. One division, two hours a week. As- 

sociate Professor Wipplinger. Sen. 4. 

21. Goethe's Faust. One division, three hours a week; one year. 

Professor Miiller. Sen. 30. 

22. Schiller's Life and Works. Four divisions, three hours a week 

each; one semester. Associate Professor Wipplinger, six 
hours. G. Schmidt, six hours. Sen. 2, Jun. 30, Soph. 53, Fr. 
8. Total 93. 

23. Studies in Structure and Style. One division, one hour a week ; 

oneyear. Associate Professor Scholl. Sen. 6, Jun. 5. Total 11. 
30. Studies in Modern German Idiom. Four divisions, one hour a 

week each; one year. F. E. Hastings. Sen. 3, Jun. 19, Soph. 

33, Fr. 2. Total 57. 
33. Studies in Modern German Idiom. One division, one hour a 

week; oneyear. F.E.Hastings. Sen. 2, Jun. 4. Total 6. 

GREEK. 

I. Lysias. Selected Orations. Plato. Homer. Studies in Greek 
Life. Two Divisions, three hours a week each; one year. 
Associate Professor Montague. Associate Professor Edwards. 
Sen. 2, Soph. 5, Fr. 16. Total 23. 

3. Historians. Thucydides. Herodotus, ^schylus. One division ; 

three hours a week; one year. Associate Professor Edwards, 
Soph. 4. 

4. Greek Drama. Aristotle's Theory of Tragedy, ^schylus : Pro- 

metheus. Sophocles : Oedipus Tyrannus, Antigone. Eurip- 
ides : Bacchffi. Aristophanes: Frogs (selections). One 
division, three hours a week; one year. Professor Chapin. 
Sen. 3, Jun. 5. Total 8. 
8. History of Greek Literature. One division, one hour a week, 
one year. Professor Chapin. Sen. 13, Jun. 9, Soph. i. 
Total 23. 

45 



Wellesley College 

11. Advanced Greek Syntax and Prose Composition. One division, 

two hours a week ; one year. Associate Professor Montague. 
Jun. I, Soph I. Total 2. 

12. Homeric Seminary. One division, three hours a week; one year. 

Associate Professor Edwards. Sen. 3. 

13. Elementary Course. Greek Grammar. Xenophon (selections). 

Practice in writing Greek. One division, three hours a week; 
one year. Associate Professor Montague. Jun. i, Soph, i, 
Fr. 12. Total 14. 

14. Continuation of 13. Xenophon: Anabasis. Homer: Iliad (three 

books). Sight translation. Prose composition based on prose 
reading. One division, three hours a week; one year. Asso- 
ciate Professor Edwards. Jun. 3, Soph. 2, Fr. 3. Total 8. 

HISTORY. 

1. Political History of England to 1603. Two divisions, three hours 

a week each : one semester. Dr. Brown. Sen. 3, Jun. 5, Soph. 
8, Fr. 52. Total 68. 

2. Political History of England from 1485 to the Present Time. Two 

divisions, three hours a week each; one semester. Dr. Brown. 
Sen. 6, Jun. 4, Soph. 10, Fr. 50. Total 70. 

3. History of Western Europe from the Fifth Century to the Treaties 

of Westphalia. Five divisions, three hours a week each; one 
year. Associate Professor Moffett. Dr. Brown. M. L. Moses. 
Sen. 15, Jun. 24, Soph. 43, Fr. 53, Sp. i. Total 136. 

4. History of the French Revolution. One division, three hours a 

week; one year. Associate Professor Orvis. Sen. 17, Jun. 32, 
Soph. 9, Fr. 3. Total 61. 

5. Constitutional History of England to 1399. One division, three 

hours a week ; one semester. Associate Professor Moffett. 
Sen. 9, Jun. 5. Total 14. 

6. Constitutional History of England from 1399 to the Present Time. 

One division, three hours a week; one semester. Associate 
Professor Moffett. Sen. 7, Jun. 5. Total 12. 

7. History of the United States from 17S7. One division, three hours 

a week; one 3'ear. Associate Professor Mathews. Grad. 1, 
Sen. iS, Jun. 14. Total 33. 
9. Europe since 1740. One division, three hours a week; one year. 
Associate Professor Orvis. Grad. i, Sen. 25, Jun. 3, Soph, i, 
Fr. I. Total 31. 

13. History of Rome. One division, three hours a week; one year. 

M. L. Moses. Sen. 3, Jun. 7, Soph. 4. Total 14. 

14. Early American History. One division, three hours a week ; one 

year. Associate Professor Mathews. Sen. 3, Jun. i. Soph. 18, 
Fr. 2. Total 24. 

46 



Appendix to the Dean's Report 

i6. Europe in the Sixteenth Century. One division, three hours a 
-week; one year. Associate Professor Moffett. Grad. i, Sen. 
14, Jun. 5. Total 20. 

19. Geography of European History. One division, one hour a week; 

one year. Associate Professor Moffett. Grad. i, Sen. 8, Jun. 
19, Soph. S. Total 36. 

20. The Politics of Eastern Europe. One division, one hour a week; 

one year. Associate Professor Orvis. Sen. 16, Jun. 6. 
Total 22. 

21. Selected studies in American History. One division, three hours 

a week; one year. Associate Professor Mathews. Grad. i, 
Sen. 15, Jun. 2. Total iS. 



HYGIENE AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

1. Kinesiology. Three hours a week; one year. Dr. Collin. Soph. 

2, Sp. 23. Total 25. 

2. Practical Gymnastics. Five hours a week; one year. Dr. Collin. 

Soph. 6, Sp. 23. Total 29. 

3. Corrective Gymnastics and Massage. Two hours a week; one 

year. Dr. Sterling. Sp. 20. 

5. Normal Instruction and Gymnastic Games. Four hours a week; 

one year. Dr. Collin. Sp. 23. 

6. Dancing. One hour a week; one year. M. W. Hartwell. Fr. 2, 

Sp. 20. Total 22. 

7. Athletics. Six hours a week in the spring. M. W. Hartwell. 

E. L. Williams. Sp. 21. 
9. Theory of Gymnastics and Art of Teaching. Two hours a week ; 
one year. Dr. Collin. Sp. 31. 

10. Practical Gymnastics. Four hours a week ; one year. Dr. Collin. 

Soph. 3, Fr. I, Sp. 28. Total 32. 

11. Symptomatology. One hour a week ; one semester. Dr. Sterling. 

Sp. 14. 

12. History of Physical Education. One hour a week; one year. A. 

C. Stedman. Soph, i, Sp. 4. Total 5. 

13. Physiology and Hygiene. Four hours a week ; one year. Dr. 

Pratt. Sp. 27. 

14. Practice Teaching. Two hours a week ; one year. Dr. Collin. 

E. M. Fearon. M. W. Hartwell. E. L. Williams. Sp. 31. 

15. Folk Dancing and Games, Two hours a week : one year. E. L. 

Williams. Sp. 31. 

16. Field and Track Athletics. One hour a week ; one semester. Dr. 

Collin. Sp. 27. 

17. Corrective Gymnastics. One hour a week ; one semester. Dr. 

Sterling. Sp. 12. 

47 



Wellesley College 

i8. Outdoor Games and Athletics. Five hours a week in the spring 
and in the fall. M. W. Hartwell. Sp. 31. 

19. Anthropometry. One hour a week; one semester. L. F. 

Carney. Sp. 26. 

20. Dancing. Two hours a week ; one year. M. W. Hartwell. 

Sp. 28. 

21. Hygiene and Physical Education. Three divisions, two hours a 

week each ; one year. M. W. Hartwell. E. M. Fearon. Group 
games, Fr. 410. Gymnastics, Fr. 365. 

22. Hygiene and Physical Education. Three divisions, two hours a 

week each ; one year. M. W. Hartwell. E. M. Fearon. Group 
games, Soph. 124. Gymnastics, Jun. i. Soph. 279. 

23. Advanced Gymnastics. Two hours a week from November until 

April. E. M. Fearon. Sen. 15, Jun. 40. Total 55. 

24. Corrective Gymnastics. Two hours a week from November until 

April. Dr. Sterling. Jun. 5, Soph. 10, Fr. 36. Total 51. 

26. Dancing. Two hours a week from November until April. E. M. 
Fearon. Sen. 104, Fr. 73. Total 177. 

28. Organized Sports. Three hours a week in the fall and spring 

terms. E. M. Fearon. E. L. Williams. Sen. 104, Jun. 144, 
Soph. 167. Total 415. 

29. Hygiene. One hour a week; one year. Director Amy Morris 

Homans. Sen. i. Soph. 14, Fr. 406. Total 421. 

30. Instruction in Games and Plays. Two hours a week ; one year. 

E. L. Williams. Sp. 23. 



ITALIAN. 

1. Italian grammar, reading, translation, exercises in speaking. One 

division, three hours a week; one year. Professor Jackson. 
Jun. 3, Soph. 3, Fr. 2. Total 8. 

2. Intermediate Course. One division, three hours a week; one 

year. Professor Jackson. Grad. i,Jun. 3. Total 4. 

3. History of Italian Literature in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth 

Centuries. Emphasis on Dante. One division, three hours a 
week; one year. Professor Jackson. Sen. 2. 

5. Dante and the Early Italian Renaissance. One division, three 
hours a week ; one year. Professor Jackson. Sen. 3, Jun. 5. 
Total S. 

9. Literature of the Italian Renaissance. One division, three hours 
a week; one year. Professor Jackson. Grad i. 

48 



Appendix to the Dean's Report 

LATIN. 

1. Livy, Books XXI, XXII: Cicero, De Senectute, Somnium Scipi- 

onis ; Horace, Odes, Book I. Four divisions, three hours a 
week each; one year. Associate Professor Fletcher, three 
hours. M. Cogswell, six hours. L. G. Eldridge, three hours. 
Sen. I, Soph. I, Fr. 95. Total 97. 

2. Poetry of the Augustan Age, Horace. Two divisions, three hours 

a week each; one semester. Associate Professor Fletcher. 
Jun. S, Soph. 25, Fr. i. Total 34. 

4. Comedy. Selected Plays of Plautus and Terence. One division, 

three hours a week each ; one semester. Professor Hawes. 
Grad. 1, Jun. 22, Soph. i. Total 24. 

5. Satire. Selections chiefly from Horace and Juvenal. One divi- 

sion, three hours a week each ; one semester. Professor Hawes. 
Grad. i, Jun. 22, Soph i. Total 24. 
7. Sight reading in prose and verse. One division, one hour a week; 
one year. M. Cogswell. Jun. i. Soph. 9. Total 10. 

10. Prose Composition. Advanced Course. One division, one hour 

a week ; one year. Associate Professor Fletcher. Sen. 2, Jun. 
3. Totals. 

11. Prose Composition. Intermediate Course. One division, one 

hour a week ; one year. M. Cogswell. Sen. 2, Jun. 16, Soph. 
6. Total 24. 

12. Outline History of Latin Literature. One division, one hour a 

week; one year. Professor Hawes. Grad. i. Sen. i, Jun. i. 
Total 3. 
14. Literature of the Empire. One division, three hours a week ; one 
year. Professor Hawes. Sen. 14. 

16. Private Life of the Romans. One division, one hour a week; one 

year. Professor Hawes. Grad. i. Sen. 6, Jun. i. Total 8. 

17. Studies in Tacitus and Pliny. Two divisions, three hours a week 

each ; one semester. Associate Professor Fletcher. Jun. 8, 
Soph. 26, Fr. 2. Total 35. 

19. Livy and Cicero. One division, three hours a week ; one semes- 

ter. Associate Professor Fletcher. Sen. 4, Jun. 3. Total 7. 

20. Ovid and Cicero. Early religious institutions of the Romans. 

One division, three hours a week; one semester. Associate Pro- 
fessor Fletcher. Sen. 3, Jun. 3. Total 6. 



APPLIED MATHEMATICS. 

I. Introduction to the Mathematical Treatment of Science. One 
division, three hours a week; one year. Professor Hayes. 
Jun. I. 

49 



Wellesley College 

PURE MATHEMATICS. 

I. Required Course for Freshmen. («) Solid and Spherical Geom- 
etry; (d) Higher Algebra; (c) Plane Trigonometry. Seventeen 
divisions, four hours a week each; one year. Associate Pro- 
fessor Chandler. Associate Professor Merrill. Associate Pro- 
fessor Vivian. Dr. Smith. Dr. Worthington. S. E. Stewart. 
Sen. 2, Jun. 3, Soph. 18, Fr. 414, Sp. i. Total 438. 

3. Conic Sections and Plane Analytical Geometry. Three divisions, 
three hours a week each ; one year. Associate Professor 
Chandler. Associate Professor Merrill. Associate Professor 
Vivian. Sen. i, Jun. 3, Soph. 31, Fr. 3. Total 38. 

3. Differential and Integral Ctlculus. Two divisions, three hours a 
week each; one year. Professor Burrell. Sen. 7, Jun. 28, 
Soph. I, Sp. I. Total 37. 

6. Modern Sj'nthetic Geometry. One division, three hours a week ; 
one year. Professor Burrell. Grad. i, Sen. 9, Soph. i. 
Total II. 

9. Higher Analysis. One division, three hours a week ; one year. 

Associate Professor Merrill. Grad. i. Sen. 6. Total 7. 
12. Algebraic and Trigonometric Analysis. One division, one hour a 
week; one year. Professor Burrell. Grad. i, Sen. 9, Jun. 9, 
Soph. 7, Fr. 2. Total 28. 



MUSIC. 

MUSICAL THEORY. 

I. Harmony. One division, three hours a week; one year. Pro- 
fessor Macdougall. H. S. Wheeler. Sen. 2, Jun. 5, Soph. 10, 
Fr. 4, Sp. I. Total 22. 

6. Counterpoint. One division, three hours a week; one semester. 

Associate Professor Hamilton. Sen. 3, Jun. 6, Soph. i. 
Total 10. 

7. Musical Form. One division, three hours a week ; one semester. 

Associate Professor Hamilton. Sen. 3, Jun. 5, Soph. 1. 

Total 9. 
S. Foundation Principles. One division, three hours a week; one 

year. Professor Macdougall. Sen. 11, Jun. 8, Soph. 10, Fr. 2. 

Total 31. 
9. Applied Harmony. One division, two hours a week; one year. 

Professor Macdougall. Sen. i, Jun. i. Soph. 25 Fr. 2, Sp. i. 

Total 7. 
II. Applied Counterpoint. One division, two hours a week; one 

semester. Associate Professor Hamilton. Sen. i. Soph. i. 

Total 2. 



50 



Appendix to the Dean's Report 

12. Applied Form. One division, two hours a week; one semester. 
Associate Professor Hamilton. Sen. i, Soph. i. Total 2. 

14. History of Music. One division, three hours a week; one year. 

Associate Professor Hamilton. Sen. 42, Jun. 20, Soph. 6. 
Total 68. 

15. Elementary Theory. One division, two hours a week ; one year. 

H. S. Wheeler. Fr. 42, Sp. i. Total 43. 
18. Beethoven and Wagner. One division, three hours a week ; one 
year. Professor Macdougall. Sen. 17, Jun. 3. Total 20. 

INSTRUMENTAL AND VOCAL MUSIC. 

Piano. 

E. J. Hurd, 14J hours. Associate Professor Hamilton, 13^ 

hours. A. A. Cummings, i8f hours. 
Voice. 

E. E. Torrey, 9I hours. 
Organ. 

Professor Macdougall, i hour. 
Violin. 

A. T. Foster, ii^- hours. 

Students : Piano, 67 ; Voice, 12 ; Organ, 2 ; Violin, 14. Total 95. 



COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY. 

I. General Introduction to the Science of Language. One division, 
two hours a week; one year. Associate Professor Edwards. 
Sen. 3, Jun. 2. Total 5. 

8. Old English (English Language 4). One division, three hours a 

week; one year. Associate Professor Lockwood. Grad. 6, 
Sen. 3. Total 9. 

9. Old French (French 11). One division, three hours a week; one 

year. Professor Colin. Grad. 2, Sen. 5. Total 7. 



PHILOSOPHY. 

1. Introduction to Psychology. Three divisions, three hours a week 

each; one semester. Professor Calkins. Dr. Cook. Sen. 2, 
Jun. 153, Soph, 27, Sp. 6. Total 18S. 

2. Aesthetics. One division, one hour a week ; one year. Professor 

Calkins. Sen. 4, Jun. 2. Total 6. 

3. Logic. One division, one hour a week; one year. Professor 

Gamble. Soph. 9, Fr. 2. Total 11. 



Wellesley College 

6. Introduction to Philosophy-. Two divisions, three hours a week 

each; one semester. Professor Calkins. Dr. Cook. Sen. 2, 
Jun. 95, Soph. 25. Total 122. 

7. Introductory Course in Experimental Psychology. One division, 

three hours a week; one year. Professor Gamble. Sen. i, 
Jun. 87, Soph. 16. Total 104. 
9. Second Course in Modern Philosophy. One division, three hours 
a week ; one year. Professor Calkins. Grad. i, Sen. 27, Jun. 6. 
Total 34. 
10. Greek Philosophy. One division, three hours a week ; one year. 
Professor Case. Sen. 4, Jun. 13. Total 17. 

13. Historical Studies in Ethics. One division, three hours a week; 

one year. Professor Case. Grad. 2, Sen. 3. Total 5. 

14. Reading and Research Course in Psychology. One division, three 

hours a week; one year. Professor Gamble. Sen. 3, Jun. i. 
Total 4. 

15. Second Research Course in Psychology. One division, three 

hours a week; one year. Dr. Cook. Grad. i. 
i6. Social Ethics. Two divisions, three hours a week each ; one 

semester. Professor Case. Sen. 2, Jun. 58, Soph. 2. Total 62. 
18. Advanced Course in General Experimental Psychology. One 

division, three hours ;i week: one year. Dr. Cook. Grad. 6, 

Jun. I. Total 7. 
20. Special Historical Studies in Philosophy. One division, six hours 

a week ; one semester. Professor Calkins. Professor Case. 

Grad i. 



PHYSICS. 

1. General Physics. Three divisions, three hours a week each ; one 

year. Associate Professor McDowell. M. E. Sawtelle. E. W. 
Fuller. Grad. i, Sen. 3, Jun. 6, Soph. 10, Fr. 59. Total 79. 

2. Outline Physics. One division, three hours a week ; one semester. 

Associate Professor J^IcDowell. Sp. 12. 

3. Heat, Light, and Electricity. One division, three hours a week; 

one year. Associate Professor Davis. Grad. i. Sen. 2, Jun. 7, 
Soph. 4. Total 14. 

5. Advanced Optics. One division, three hours a week; one semes- 

ter. Professor Whiting. Associate Professor Davis. Grad. i. 
Sen. 4, Jun. 3. Total 8. 

6. Meteorology. One division, one hour a week ; one year. Associate 

Professor Davis. Jun. 2, Soph. 2. Total 4. 
8. Advanced Electricity. One division, three hours a week; one 
semester. Professor Whiting. Associate Professor Davis. 
Sen. 3, Jun. 3. Total 6. 

52 



Appendix to the Dean's Report 

SPANISH. 

1. Elementary Course, grammar, reading, composition, conversation. 

One division, three liours a week; one year. C. Marcial. 
Grad. i. Sen. i, Jun. 4, Soph. 9, Sp. i. Total 16. 

2. Intermediate Course. One division, three hours a week ; one year. 

C. Marcial. Sen. 4, Jun. 2, Soph. i. Total 7. 



ZOOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 

1. Biology of Animals. Five divisions, three hours a week each ; 

one year. Associate Professor Robertson, twelve hours, first 
semester. Associate Professor Hubbard, six hours. C. M. 
Holt, six hours, second semester. M. L. Robinson, six hours. 
Sen. I, Soph. 38, Fr. 58, Sp. i. Total 98. 

2. Zoology of Vertebrates. One division, three hours a week ; one 

j'ear. Dr. Cook. Sen. 3, Jun. 20, Soph. 12, Fr. i. Total 36. 
5. Advanced Invertebrate Zoology. One division, three hours a 
week; one semester. Associate Professor Robertson. Sen. 6, 
Jun. I. Total 7. 

7. Insects. One division, three hours a week ; one semester. Asso- 

ciate Professor Thompson. A. P. Morse. Sen. 7, Jun. i. 
Total 8. 

8. Embryology and Cell Structure. One division, three hours a 

week; one year. Associate Professor Thompson. Sen. 7, 
Jun. 4. Total 11. 

10. Animal Physiology. One division, three hours a week ; one 

year. Associate Professor Robertson. Sen. 6, Jun. 2. Total 8. 

11. Anatomy. One division, three hours a week ; one year. CM. 

Holt, first semester. Associate Professor Thompson, second 
semester. Sp. 21. 



53 



Wellesley College 



SUMMARY 



Subject. 



English Literature . 

German 

French 

History 

Philosophy* .... 

Botany 

Art 

Chemistry 

Economics and Sociology 

Greek 

Musical Theory 

Latin 

Biblical History * . . . 

Zoology 

Pure Mathematics * . . 
English Composition *t 

Italian 

Astronomy 

English Language . . 

Physics 

Education 

Geology 

Philology 

Elocution 

Spanish 

Applied Mathematics 

Hebrew 

Archaeology .... 
Hygiene and Physical 
Education* .... 



c 1; 



O u u 



-So 



22 

23 

18 
20 

iS 

9 
II 
II 
iS 

13 

14 
16 

II 
8 

10 
S 
8 
6 

4 

7 
4 
5 
5 
3 

2 

4 
I 

3 

28 



I en 

O I. 2 «J 



54>^ 

3« 

35 

4i>^ 
23 
24 
21 

30 
34 
32 
26 

25 
22 
26 

15 
21 

16 

12 

12 
12 
10/2 

7 
6 

3 
6 

See 



u « 7 

■4-.'C o 

o t. ►■ 

. n c> 

o u - 



17 

21 
18 

M 
13 

8 

9 
II 

13 

8 

10 

13 
8 

7 
6 

8 

5 
5 

4 
6 

3 

4 
3 

2 



pages 



^ 4; ii o 
o ^ c " 

S o « 



n ■_ " "■' 

O U cj u 



45 

35:!^ 

35 

32 

3o>^ 

22 

21 

21 

21 

21 

21 

20 

19 

19 

17 

15 

15 

13 

12 

1I>2 

9 
9 

8 

7 
6 



47. 48- 






9 
8 
6 
5 
4 
9 
5 
4 
3 
3 
7 

4 
6 

6 

7 
12 
I 
3 
3 

5 
I 

3 
3 

2 
I 
I 



3 u c 

o.SS. 
o -a 



637 

517 

431 
364 
369 

157 

157 

251 
80 

185 
241 
621 
176 

534 

SSo 

23 

83 

44 

123 

132 
88 
21 

112 

23 
I 



10S7 



So C 

o at. 

— . ■•' ci 
= 1^ 



816 

956 
624 

559 
562 

396 
199 
188 
441 

85 

214 

291 

624 

1 89 

559 

899 

23 

84 

44 

123 

134 
92 

21 
114 

23 

I 



2267 



*It should be noted that a fixed amount of work in this department is absolutely required 
for the B.A. degree. 

t It will be noted that courses in English Language are reported separately from those 
in English Composition. 



54 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 



OF 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 
I9II 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 
Deficit at August 1, 1910 $20,825 65 

Add : Cost of Gymnasium and Library Construction 

in excess of amount contributed for the same $17,305 77 
Loss on sale of Harrison Avenue House, Boston 2,000 00 



Less : Dividend on Stock of National Bank 

of Republic in liquidation . . $100 00 

Sale of Land in Xewmarket, N. H. . 25 00 

Sundry Retrospective Adjustments . 1,121 25 

Surplus for year ending July 31, 1911 3,631 66 



19,305 77 



4,877 91 



Increase in deficit for year ending July 31, 1911 

Deficit at July 31, 1911 

The deficit at July 31, 1911, as stated above, is reflected in the 
Balance Sheet as follows : — 
Deficit of Current Assets, as per Schedule D (Part 1) 
Deficit of Investment Assets, as per Schedule D (Part 2) 

Deficit at July 31, 1911 



14,427 86 
■$35,253 51 



$21,475 88 
13,777 63 

$35,253 51 



Schedule A 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

SUMMARIES 
For the Tear ending July 31, 1911 

INCOME AND EXPENDITURE 

Income for year. Schedule B . . . . 
Expenditure for year, Schedule C . 

Net surplus for year .... 

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 

Current Assets at end of year, Schedule D 
Current Liabilities at end of year, Schedule D 

Deficit of Current Assets 
Investment Assets at end of year. Schedule D 
Investment Liabilities at end of year. Schedule D 

Deficit of Investment Assets . 

EDUCATIONAL PLANT 

Investment in Educational Plant, Lands, Buildings 
and Equipment (Assessed Valuation) : — 

Property Exempted $2,326,392 

Property Taxed 76,925 



$410,160 39 
406,528 73 

$3,631 66 

$36,941 57 
58,417 45 

$21,475 88 

$918,798 35 

932,575 98 

$13,777 63 



00 
00 



$2,403,317 00 



56 



Schedule B 
WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

INCOME 

For the Tear ending July 31, 1911 



Income from Students: 

Tuition Fees 

Special Fees for Laboratories, Degrees, etc. 
Incidental Fees, Matriculation Fees, etc. 
*For Dormitories and Dining Halls (net) 

Income from Investments : 

Endowments for Designated Purposes, Schedule Q 
Less : Amounts transferred from General Income 

Total Income from Investments, Schedule H . 
Deduct : Amounts transferred to Principal Ac- 
counts of Funds 

Income from Other Sources: 

Rents 

Interest on Bank Deposits 

Storage 

Bookstore 

Cashing Cheques 

Float Day 

Tree Day Supper 



•52.30,706 4.5 




21,9.38 0.5 




1,866 35 




110,427 70 






$364,938 55 




355,935 05 




3,940 02 




851,995 03 




13,465 11 






38,529 92 




S778 00 




2,606 17 




345 80 




2,486 02 




111 00 




163 79 




201 14 






6,691 92 






■5410,160 39 



♦Charges for heat, lighting, -water, insurance, maintenance (repairs, etc.), are 
charged to various current expense accounts and the central po-wer plant. 



57 



Schedule C 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

EXPENSE 

For the Year ending July 31, 1911 
Departmental Expenses : 

Salaries of Professors, Assistants, etc.. Schedule 

C-2 $165,283 75 

Departmental Appropriations and Sundry Ex- 
penses 8,832 82 

Payments from Income of Special Funds . . 21,546 31 

Scholarships Paid from Income of Special Funds 

Administration and General Expenses : 

Salaries of Officers .... 

Boston Office 

Clerical Assistance .... 

Office Supplies, Stationery, Postage, etc. 
Telephone and Telegraph 
Traveling Expenses .... 

Printing, etc 

Simpson Hospital 

Express 

Entrance Examination Board 

Taxes 

Legal and Auditor .... 
Interest on Notes Payable . . . 
Sundries 



Operation and Maintenance of Plant : 

Janitors, Cleaning, etc. 
Pianos, Class-room Fittings, etc. 
Insurance .... 
Repairs, Labor and Material 
Power House, Wages and Supplies 
Labor .... 
Fuel, Gas and Oil . 
Construction Account . 
Farm, Labor and Supplies 
Surveys, Blue Prints 
Hedge, Athletic Grounds 
Sundry Equipment, etc. 
Sundries 



Miscellaneous Expenses : 

Exhibits—" World in Boston " . 

Schools in Rome, Athens and Naples 

Addresses 

Lectures 

Ministers 

Entertainments, etc. 

Sundries 





$195,662 


88 




11,997 


26 


§30,157 10 






501 64 






507 22 






2,680 24 






540 63 






425 47 






4,100 81 






7,386 52 






1,124 80 






196 60 






923 10 






537 95 






510 42 






290 17 








49,882 


67 




$2,797 63 






4,393 41 






4,102 79 






25,840 41 






14,755 29 






19,085 28 






26,633 36 






28,138 96 






18,567 79 






435 84 






170 00 






195 02 






551 38 








145,667 


16 




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550 00 






100 00 






534 70 






825 00 






966 13 






203 09 








3,318 


76 





Expense for the year ending July 31, 1911 



$406,528 73 



58 



Schedule C-2 



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Schedule D 
WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

BALANCE SHEET 

July 31, 1911 

1. CUKRENT ASSETS 

Cash in Banks and on Hand for Current Expenses, Schedule E . $5,216 24 

Note Receivable 05 00 

Accounts Receivable, Schedule F 7,168 21 

Bookstore Stock on Hand . . 4,157 53 

Grants Account (Departmental Appropriations, Overdraft) . 201 22 

Fuel— Stock on Hand 3,010 00 

Insurance Prepaid 17,123 37 

Total Current Assets $36,941 57 

Deficiency of Current Assets 21,475 88 

Total Current Assets and Deficiency $58,417 45 



2. INVESTMENT ASSETS 

Securities, Schedule H $908,584 98 

Cash in Banks for Investments, Schedule £ 10,213 37 

Total Investment Assets . $918,798 35 

Deficiency of Investment Assets 13,777 63 

Total Investment Assets and Deficiency .... $932,575 98 



6o 



Schedule D 
WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

BALANCE SHEET 

July 31, 1911 

1. CUKEENT LIABILITIES 

Notes Payable $25,000 00 

Accounts Payable, Schedule N 33,417 45 



Total Current Liabilities §58,417 45 



2. ENDOWMENT FUNDS 

Endowment Capital Accounts : — 

Funds for General Purposes, Schedule P . . 8292,938 16 
Funds for Designated Purposes, Schedule Q . 975,999 79 



§1,268,937 95 
Less: Amount Invested in Dormitories, Sched- 
ule J 338,190 66 

8930,747 29 

Unexpended Income : — 

Funds for Designated Purposes, Schedule Q-2 . 1,828 69 



Total Liabilities Endowment Funds . . 8932,575 98 



6i 



Schedule E 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

CASH BALANCE 

July 31, 1911 

Cash on Hand for Immediate Use : 
State National Bank of Boston 
Wellesley National Bank .... 
Cash in Hand — Bookstore .... 
Cashier .... 

Cash on Hand for Investments : 

"Wellesley Savings Bank .... 

American Trust Company .... 



.$3,564 04 

1,298 82 

132 07 

221 31 


.$5,216 24 
10,213 37 


.$245 18 
9,968 19 






.$1.5,429 61 



Schedule F 
WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 
July 31, 1911 

Shakespeare Society $6 46 

Zeta Alpha Society . 2 13 

Alpha Kappa Chi Society 95 

Lake Waban Laundry Company 2,144 54 

Bookstore Accounts Receivable 250 67 

Boathouse Account 96 82 

Piano Fund "1)088 14 

Wellesley Views 298 50 

Green & Company (Provision Account) 280 GO 

.$7,168 21 



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Schedule J 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 
INVESTMENTS IN DORMITORIES 



July 31, 1911 

Shafer Hall 

North Lodge 

President's House 

Cazenove Hall . 

Pomeroy Hall 

Beebe Hall 

Eliot Cottage (Construction 1911) 



.$107,022 75 

2,500 00 

13,550 00 

80,000 00 

24,356 91 

107,761 00 

3,000 00 

.$338,190 66 



Schedule N 
WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 

July 31, 1911 

Application Fees -516,165 00 

Room Registration 9,560 00 

Room Registration (Suspense Account) 20 00 

T. Z. E. Society (Suspense Account) 39 22 

Library Furnishing Account 104 08 

Library Book Account 119 24 

Library Expense Account 2,871 89 

H. D. (jrould Income Account No. 1 4 50 

Sabbatical Grant 1,375 00 

Scientific Fund 1,883 92 

Margaret Dixon Memorial Fund 1,274 60 

5,417 45 



Schedule P 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

ENDOWMENT FUNDS FOR GENERAL PURPOSES 

For the Year ending July 31, 1911 



FUND. 


Total Principal 
Received to 
Beginniag ] 
of Year. 


Alumnae Endowment 


$133,469 31 


General Endowment 


158,136 05 




•$291,605 36 




69 



Additions to Total Principal 
Principal Received and 
Received During Unexpended at 
the Year. End of Year. 



.$1,332 80 



.$134,802 11 
158,136 05 



.$1,332 80 .$292,938 16 



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74 



Schedule Q-1 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 



SUMMARY OF ENDOWMENT FUNDS AND THE INVESTMENTS 

HELD FOR SAME 



July 31, 1911 

ENDOWMENT FUNDS 

Scholarship Funds, Schedule Q 
Professorship Funds, Schedule Q 
Special Funds, Schedule Q 
Alumnae Endowment, Schedule P 
General Endowment, Schedule P 



$252,243 95 
224,243 03 
499,512 81 
134,802 11 
158,136 05 



Total Endowment Funds 



$1,208,937 95 



INVESTMENT OF FUNDS 

Book Value. 
Bonds, Schedule H $549,593 12 



Stocks, Schedule H . 
Real Estate Mortgages, Schedule H 
Investments in Dormitories, Schedule J 
Cash on Hand for Investments : — 
Wellesley Savings Bank 
American Trust Company 



§245 18 
9,968 19 



170,991 86 
188,000 00 
338,190 66 



10,213 37 



Total Investments 

Under-investment of Endowment Funds 



1,256,989 01 



§11,948 94 



75 



Schedule Q-2 
WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

UNEXPENDED INCOME OF FUNDS FOR DESIGNATED PURPOSES 

July 31, 1911 

Unexpended Income of the following Funds : — 

E, H, F. Williams Fund $6 00 

Elsa D. James Scholarship 13 44 

Sophie Jewett Fund 17 89 

Amos W. Stetson Fund 186 11 

Gorham D. Abbott Fund 5 12 

R. C. Billings Prize 46 67 

H. K. Furness Fund 107 84 

E. N. Kirk Fund 112 49 

Sarah R. Mann Fund 62 78 

Organ Fund 53 61 

A. F, Palmer Memorial Fund 647 91 

Shafer Library Fund 205 59 

Wenckebach Memorial Fund 71 06 

Fiske Cottage Fund 160 00 

Gertrude Library Fund 271 88 



•$1,968 39 



Deduct : 

Over-payments of Income of the following Funds : — 

E. A. Kendall Fund 

Three Sisters Choir Fund 

Alexandra Garden Memorial Fund . 



Net Amount of Unexpended Income of Funds for 

Designated Purposes $1,828 69 



15 06 




64 81 




69 83 






139 70 





76 



Schedule S 
WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

DEFICIT ACCOUNT 
July 31, 1911 

Deficit at August 1, 1910 §20,825 65 

Add: 

Gymnasium Construction — Balance of Cost of 

Construction above Amount Contributed $14,927 43 
Library Construction — Balance of Cost of Con- 
struction above Amount Contributed . 2,378 34 
Adjustment of Amount Charged to Library 

Expense, March 31, 1910 .... 78 75 

Loss on Sale of Harrison Avenue Douse . . 2,000 00 



$19,384 52 



Less : 

Balance Due on a Student's Account 

for 1909 and 1910 .... $100 00 
Salary for 1908, 1909, 1910 charged to 

" The Ridgeway Account " . 1,100 00 

Dividend on Stock of National Bank 

of the Republic (in Liquidation) 100 00 
Sale of Land in Newmarket, N. H. . . 25 00 



1,325 00 



18,059 52 
$38,885 17 



Deduct : 
Surplus for Tear Ending July 31, 1911, as 

per Schedule A . . . . 3,631 66 

Deficit at July 31, 1911: 

Deficit of Current Assets, Schedule D $21,475 88 
Deficit of Investment Assets, Sched- 
ule D 13,777 63 

$35,253 51 



// 



CERTIFICATE 
We Hereby Certify : — 

That all income receivable from invested funds and deposits with banks 
and trust companies has been duly accounted for ; that the securities repre- 
senting the invested funds have been produced to us ; that all other income 
shown by the books of the College has been duly accounted for ; that all pay- 
ments have been properly vouched ; that the cash in banks and on hand has 
been verified, and that the balance sheet and accounts submitted herewith, 
which are arranged in the form recommended by The Carnegie Foundation 
for the Advancement of Teaching, contain a true statement of the condition of 
the funds of the College at the close of business July 31, 1911, and are in 
accordance with the books, with the exception that the educational plant, 
land, buildings and equipment have been shown at the local Assessors' 
valuation of the College property. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Patterson, Teele & Dennis, 

Certified Public Accountants. 
[Seal.] 



78 



LOAN FUNDS FOR THE AID OF STUDENTS. 
Held by Wellesley College. 

Catherine Ayer Ransom Scholarship of • . . $1,000 00 
The income thereof to be loaned to worthy 
students by the Students' Aid Society of Welles- 
ley College 

McDonald-Ellis Loan Fund 500 00 

Wellesley College Loan Fund 2,143 71 



$3,643 71 



ANALYSIS OF CONDITION OF WELLESLEY COLLEGE LOAN FUND AT CLOSE OF 

FISCAL YEAR, AUGUST 1, 1911, 

Balance, August 1, 1910 

Interest (10 months) 

Income from McDonald- Ellis Memorial Fund (includ- 
ing income due to August 1, 1910) 

Mary B. W. Alexander Fund 

Contributions from Alumn:e and former students 
Contributions from the Faculty (not Alumnte) . 
Repayment of Loans 



Loaned to students 

Balance on hand August 1, 1911 .$2,143 71 



$2,925 26 


51 45 


65 00 


100 00 


187 00 


10 00 


355 00 


$3,693 71 


1,550 00 



79